Podcast

Podcast

You are invited to subscribe to Catholic Cardinal Reflections, the regular podcast of the Catholic Community at Stanford. We feature Sunday homilies, lectures from classes, Newman Nights and other events as well as special celebrations such as baptisms.

Here is the URL for the podcast: (no trailing slash!)
http://feeds.feedburner.com/CatholicCardinalReflections

Learn more about how to subscribe to our Podcast

Episodes

You may also listen to the Podcast episodes by clicking them below:

Podcast

The Catholic Community at Stanford is happy to announce the launch of our new Podcast feed, Catholic Cardinal Reflections. The content will include reflections, homilies and occasional talks, and a new episode will be released weekly.

Here is the URL to for the new podcast: (no trailing slash!)
http://catholic.stanford.edu/media/podcast-feed

Learn more about how to subscribe to our Podcast

Episodes

You may also listen to the Podcast episodes by clicking them below:

October 15, 2017

The Gospel reading from Matthew is the parable of the wedding feast, in which invited guests refused to come, and which ends, "many are called but few are chosen".  Fr. Xavier took the view that we are constantly invited to put on the wedding garment of wonder at God's great love for us and follow Christ.  Are we ready to listen for his invitations and to love others in grateful response?

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Pastor/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Invitation
September 17, 2017

Anger and revenge dominated on 9/11.  We can't expect Christ to forgive us, if we don't forgive those who transgress against us.  Victims must take responsibility for healing those who have wronged us.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, o.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Pastor/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Forgiveness
September 10, 2017

The Gospel for today needs to be put in context with Mathews' community and time.  If you are wronged by someone, and he won't repent, Mathew tells us we should treat him/her like a tax collector or Gentile.  But we must remember that Jesus loved them as well as everyone else.  Bottom line- build bridges to others, not walls.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Paster/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Love
September 3, 2017

Peter reveals his humanity by rebuking Christ for having to die, and Jesus tells Peter that he is not thinking like God the Father.  Sometimes we attenpt to insulate ourselves from the realities of life, but we must be careful to remember we are part of God's kingdom.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CC@S

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Insulate
August 27, 2017

Jesus was an Anti-Emperor, not a messiah ascribing to wealth, power and politics.  His message of gentle forgiveness, lowlyness and humble meekness was not what disciples first expected.  "Who do you say I am" was not an easy question.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Paster/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Jesus, meek
August 20, 2017

The Canaanite women persisted in her plea for Christ to cure her daughter, and her faith caused Jesus to heal her. You must persist in your faith of God, and you will be rewarded, too.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
August 13, 2017

Peter Is Jesus' Rock, upon which His church is built, yet he sank when his faith faltered.  This metaphor applies to us all, when we fail to trust in God.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Paster/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Faith, Trust
August 6, 2017

Dying on the cross was shameful and weak Jesus took his friends to a mountain, to explain his upcoming death in this way.  God's dream for us is not power, a PhD, or possessions.  It is that we turn the other cheek, feed the hungry and love those who oppress us- emmulate Jesus.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Paster/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Transfiguration
July 30, 2017

Jesus' parable tells of the man finding treasure and buying the land to gain it, a rather drastic measure.  Are we prepared to take drastic action to gain the kingdom of God?  Where does our treasure lie?

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, o.p.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. Paster/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Kingdom of heaven
July 23, 2017

Technology- continued from last week, Stay focused on its use to bring you closer to the teachings of Christ and their implementation in your life.

Preacher: Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, O.P.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP; Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, Catholic community at Stanford
Technology
July 16, 2017

Technology plays an ever-increasing role in our lives but should be used for the "Common Good". The Common Good is that which causes humanity to flourish, and you need others to help you to discover it.  We need to master technology to allow us to help others.

Preacher: Fr. Taylor.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP; Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, Catholic community at Stanford
technology
July 9, 2017

Jesus tells us that His yoke is light, yet He lost his life because of His great love for us.  This is counter to the societal messages of today, where it is far better to be winners.  But in Jesus, losing is the new winning.

Preacher, Rev. John Kerrigan.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Yoke, winning
July 2, 2017

Summer time is baseball time in America, and and we can use it as a metaphor for our life in Christ.  First base is falling in love with Jesus; second base is to become a disciple of Christ, and achieving third base is to fill yourself with Jesus. A home run is to love Jesus above all else, and to do good for others.

Preacher:  Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, O.P.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP; Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, Catholic community at Stanford
Baseball
June 11, 2017

"It's a mystery!", the most overused phrase in a catholic upbringing! Sometimes used to describe our triune God.  But we can think of it simply as the Father's love for us is so great that he gave his Son for us to know him and be saved; the Holy Spirit is their mutual love poured out for us.   The trinity is thus the supreme gift. Bottom line: Love God and one another as He has loved us.

Preacher:  Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P. 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P., Paster/Director, Catholic Community at Stanford
Trinity
June 4, 2017

On Pentecost, Jesus sent his followers out in the world, filled by the Holy Spirit.  Three themes of the sermon are: Reaching out, giving back, and using our gifts wisely.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Pentecost
May 28, 2017

We celebrate the Ascension of Christ on this 7th Sunday of Easter. After Jesus was taken up to be with the Father, the disciples were left without his bodily presence, but Christ promised to be with us always, and hie Spirit guides us today and for all time.  We are to share this Good News with others this week.

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Ascension
May 21, 2017

All of us have power to some extent, but it means different things to different people.  Society often equates it to wealth and prestige, but Jesus' power is the quiet power of love for others.  Let us use our power wisely this week to serve another.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Power
May 14, 2017

Jesus said, "I will prepare a place for you in my Father's house".  What he means is that you must prepare yoursel for God's kingdom. Don't just read the gospel, *feel* the gospel.  Don't just do a good deed, be part of another's struggles.  When you receive the Eucharest, understand that Christ is inside you.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, O.P.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Christ
May 7, 2017

Today's readings are about sheep and the Good Shephard whose voice they recognize and abide.  Whose voice do we listen to?  How loud is God's presence in your life?  Are we a good influence for others?

Preachet:  Deacon John Kerrigan

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
May 7. 2017

The Catholic Community welcomes with great joy into the sacrament of Baptism: Kavi Charles Banerjee, Averee Cazares, Pablo Gomez Ceniceros, Christopher Menguilo Fernandez, Ian Michael Jankowski, Amelia Lauher, Aaron Matthew Pearce, Audrey Marie Shluzas, Kate Elizabeth Wagner, Ione Forseca Zepka.

Presider: Fr. Lavagetto, O.P.

Catholic Community at Stanford
Baptism
April 30, 2017

The Pope recently advocated for a radical love, one directed towards others.  This includes coming to true faith in Christ, which the early disciples had, after Jesus revealed himself in the breaking of the bread. But this must be followed by dialog with others. We must share the good news with others.

Preacher Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Faith
April 16, 2017

Jesus joined the travelers on their way from Jerusalem, but they did not recognize the risen Christ, possibly because their distraction and lack of belief prevented them.  The Resurrection reminds us to reflect on how Christ walks with us every moment of the day.  We should look for the good things in others and keep them in our hearts.

Preacher:  Fr. Xavier Lavagetto.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Ester
April 15, 2017

With great love sometimes comes great suffering, and the greatest suffering is when love is unreturned.  Jesus suffered death on the croiss because he loved us so much.  Yet his resurrection gives us hope that we will never die if we love Christ and live in love for all his people.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter Vigil
April 14, 2017

Jesus embraces both passion and love.  We need suffering in order to grow and appreciate the gifts God gives us.  Today we must ponder the suffering Jesus willingly endured because of his great love for us.

Preacher: Fr. Emmanuel Taylor.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Good Friday, Passion
April 13, 2017

On this Holy Thursday night, we gather to remember that Jesus humbled himself and became a slave while presaging his death.  He died ignominously that we might have eternal life.  Let us walk in his path as we share his message of love with others.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto. 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Holy Thursday, Last Supper
April 9, 2017

This is a week of Journeys.  Jesus challenges us to live for others as we follow his journey in becoming a slave, entering Jerusalem in triumph, and dying for us while promising us eternal life.  

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Palm Sunday
April 2, 2017

The story of Jesus bringing Lazarus back to life has great meaning, both because it presages Christ's Ressurection to come, but it also signifies us coming back to life after casting off the many forms of death that our sins create for us.  We often ask, "Where were you, Lord, when I needed you?'  But these hard moments can bring us closer to God if we let God in.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
Lazarus
March 26, 2017

Reverend Kerrigan: "We need a Radical Vision Correction", in line with today's gospel reading, in which Jesus cures the man born blind from birth.  Like the high officials of the time, we have many blind spots in our local and world vision, including our lack of proper respect for others.  Let us turn our eyes to the Lord.

 

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Blind, vision
March 19, 2017

In the Gospel today, Jesus meets the Samaritan women at the well and promises her living water.  We can obtain living water too by coming back to Jesus this Lenten season while we re-examine our prayer.  Look within yourself and lose your innate desire for wealth and power and importance in the world.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CC@S.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Woman at well
March 12,2017

Jesus went up the mountain to pray.  Mountains are religiously significant because many important events occured there, and in today's gospel, God declares He is well pleased in Jesus his Son, to Moses, Elijah and the three disciples who accomanied Jesus.  Fr. Emmanuel wants us to go up the mountain too, to pray for blessings for ourselves and others.  He reminds us of the great importance of prayer, and to pray when we are healthy, because we may be unable when we are sick.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Payer, Mountain
March 5, 2017

Jesus fasted for 40 days, and then was tempted 3 times by the devil.  Fr. Xavier invites us to reflect how differently we are tempted than Christ was, and to think about one time today that we were tempted, and how we responded to that temptation.  We hope that by doing so, we will respond more as Christ would when faced with similar temptations tomorrow.  

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP.

fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
temptations
February 26, 2017

Christ tells us to be happy and not to worry about basic necessities; God will provide as he does for the birds of the air and lillies of the field.  Our job is to build community and love each other. In lent we practice prayer and shared wonderment at our God.  Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director, Catholic Commnity @ Stanford.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
February 19, 2017

The reading from Leviticus reminds us that we as humans are unable to attain the holiness of God.  It is through community that we can attempt to achieve that holiness.  We have the opportunity to come together as members of small groups to help each other to walk above the line in Christ.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
holiness,small groups
February 12, 2017

The slogan for today's readings might be summarized as "Choose life in Christ".  We envision a horizontal line, for which our actions are either above the line or below it.  Christ raised the bar over the laws of Moses in today's gospel, teaching radical respect for others, with wisdom, courage, understanding and awe for God's creations, including all His creatures.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Wisdom, Life
February 5, 2017

Fr, Xavier reminds us that God wants us to shine with Christ's love and extend our light to others, not to hide it. Teresa Pleins expresses that theme in terms of supporting our students, some of whose studies and education are in jeopardy from recent travel/visa restrictions by the federal government.  We need to help each other, when times are bad- Be salt, be light for others.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, Teresa Peins, Chaplain
Salt, Light
February 5, 2017

Connie Solari describes an initiative begun last fall to meet in small "Encounter Christ" groups to explore and deepen our faith through the Lenten gospel readings and prayer.  For more information, contact Nancy Greenfield, ngreenfield875@gmail.com.

Connie Solari
Lent, Encounter Christ
January 28, 2017

Christ teaches the Beaatitudes in the Sermon on the Mount- blessed are the poor and those that mourn.  However, we are obliged to not only feel their pain but to respond, for blessed too are those who comfort others.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Sermon on the Mount, Beatitudes
January 28, 2017

The Christian community welcomes with great joy our newest members of the CC@S: Gemma Rosa Brennan, Gioia Rosa Brennan, Emma Kaitlyn Leary, Alisia Therese Lebel, Cataleya Urbano Puentes, Ivy Saiz, Cara Delphine Reeder, Jackson Antony Rosa, Lilian Lee Rosa, Jianna Maria Taizan.

 

 

fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Baptism, small groups
January 22, 2017

Work, school and the ordinary tedium of life can pull us down.  Repent of whatever is troubling you and reach out for Jesus' love to help you.  Then reach out to others to change the world.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Repent, depressed
January 15. 2017

Jesus constantly surprised people by doing things backwards- contrary to expectations.  For example, why did he let John baptise him, when he should have been baptising John and others?  The answer of course is that He wanted to stand with us, and it reminds us that we should be living for others.  Our holy calling is to lift up our neighbors.

Following Fr. Xavier's sermon is a brief talk by grad student Tony Boutelle, describinh the CC@S small groups and asking us to become active therein.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, Tony Boutelle
Baptism, small groups
January 8, 2017

The theme of this Sunday's readings is on the Journey.  Like the Magi, we need to seek our Lord; God will help us to choose the right path if we spread kindness and virtuousness.  We should take a few minutes each morning to discern God's path for our heart and mind for this day.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Epiphany, discernment
December 25, 2016

Our Christmas season corresponds to Hanukkah, 8 days of celebration of dedication in the Jewish faith.  It corresponds to our 8 days from Christmas until New Years, and should signifiy for us a time of rededication to a deeper spiritual life with God.  The CC@S has been doing so in small groups, which provide support as we pray for a deeper faith in Christ.  Light a candle tonight, and then 2 next night, and watch Christ's light in you grow.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Christmas, Hanukkah
December 18, 2016

Life changing events often come from personal invitations.  Decisions are made in both head and heart. In Rev. Kerrigan's case, he was invited to become deacon and did so mostly through his heart. Joseph is central in today's Gospel. He was invited to protect Mary's integrity by an angelic message, "Do not be afrain", for God is with you.  As you prepare for the celebrtion of Jesus' rebirth, become aware of the many invitations God sends you.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Joseph, invitation
December 11, 2016

This Mass was celebrated with candlelight precession beginning at 11 PM, as the traditional CC@S celebration of Christmas, with finals week and the retturn of many students to visit their homes and families. Fr. Xavier noted that in this Christmas season, we must becone Santa Claus to others and share the goodness we see all around us with them.  Become the miracle of Christ for those you meet.

 

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Early Holiday Liturgy
December 4, 2016

The Dominican Order is celebrating its 800 year Jubilee, hving begun with a mission of preachng against slavery to a closed-minded people.  Bringing Christ's message to others is Fr. Taylor's dream for the CC@S, and we have one year to do it.  Start slowly to make straight the path of the Lord.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford/ Br. Scott
Dominicans
November 27, 2016

Jesus will come like a thief in the night.  Be ready, because the kingdom of God is now, not some time in the future.  Pray for someone this week, for you are Christ for others.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Kingdom of God
November 6, 2016

We were created for eternal life, to be holy and to be saints. You may think, "I can't be a saint—I am not worthy enough." But you can if you follow Christ's teachings. When we enable others to find Christ by example we are being saint-like.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford/ Br. Scott
Saints
October 23, 2016

The readings today all speak to our need for humility.  All our good works are for naught if we do not recognize our flaws and pray to God for forgiveness. God hears the cry of those who seek Him.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Humility
October 9, 2016

The Mass of the Holy SPirit was celebrated today by Bishop McGrath from the Diocese of San Jose.  This Mass was traditionally celebrated by the Jesuits to mark the beginning of the academic year with a special blessing, given today by the Bishop.

Bishop Patrick McGrath, Diocese of San Jose
Mass of the Holy Spirit, School
October 6, 2016

This Newman Night lecture is by Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP.  In it, he compares Jesus to Ceasar in the political milieu of the first century, and reminds us that times have changed but politics remiain an important aspect of our social fiber.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Jesus, politics, Newman Nights
October 2, 2016

We know people by their works.  The readings today are about increasing our passion for, and our faith in, Christ.  Is he first in our life?

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
faith
September 18, 2016

Money and spirituality are intimately linked. A wealthy man told Deacon John, "I plan to die poor", and set up a trust for his estate.  We have been given many gifts, and we must use them wisely, both monetary and spiritual.  The poor are our responsibility.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Poor, wealth
September 11, 2016

On this anniversary of so much pain, we are called to be so much more than just good people. We are called to be Christ to others, to be the face of and show God's mercy to our borthers and sisters.  Are we like the prodigal son, his brother who was angry, or his loving father?

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
mercy, neighbor
September 4, 2016

We spend a great deal of time getting ready for a new school year or other major events, but how much time do we spend getting ready to study God?  And how do we study God?  The best way is with a community.

fr. emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
community
August 28, 2016

We are reminded today that false humility is as evil as pride, for all gifts come from God.  Take the less auspicious seat that we may be invited to sit at one of greater honor by our host.  Practice your smile on everyone you meet today.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Pride, humility
August 21, 2016

Jesus is asked, "Will only a few be saved?"  He replies, in effect, that it is not enough to merely be familiar with Christ.  When we eat his body he is in us, and we must serve others knowing that we are the face of God. 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Salvation
August 21, 2016

The Catholic Community at Stanford welcomes with great joy our newest members: Jaiden Chow, Kylie Chow, Ella Dorsey, Connor Fahey, Poppy Kildoff, Peyton Perry, and Madeleine Wang in baptism.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Baptism
August 14, 2016

Deacon John used the story of the Syrian refugees who participated in the Summer Olympics to remind us that our Christian faith obliges us to care for others, and that there are 65 million refugees from civil and other strife in their own countries. We must do our part to welcome the needy into our homes.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
refugees
August 7, 2016

St. Dominic started the Order of Preachers (the Dominican Order) 800 years ago, and we celebrate this event and person today.  He advocated and demonstrated 1.  Humility- he lived in poverty as an example; 2.He constantly invoked prayer, and always for others; 3.  He studied, and loved his books.  Fr. Xavier brings St. Dominic to life by his own example.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
St,. Dominic
July 24, 2016

"Why do you pray?"- a question sometimes asked of Christians.  Prayer is about relationships- between you, God and the world.  Pray with persistence, like the friend in the gospel today.  The Holy Spirit will help us release Christ's love in the world.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
prayer, persistence
July 17, 2017

Abraham welcomed the Lord with great hospitality.  Your welcome of those around you will build bridges, and heal the world.  Conrad Kaminski finished by describing his journey in Going Pro in Jesus.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community, Conrad Kaminski
Going Pro
July 10, 2016

Jesus tells us to show mercy to your neighbor.  And who is your neighbor?  Every person, especially the needy.  Nancy Greenfield is introduced today by Fr. Emmanuel.

Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Mercy, neighbor
June 26, 2016

Jesus explained to his followers that that one should not look back; it is hard enough to follow God's design for us- hard things are hard to do.  We should pray and act with love in our hearts, because following Christ is worth it.  Today we celebrate the baptisms of William, Lucille and Evan.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Love, baptism
June 19,016

On this Father's day, we are reminded of the Father's love of all, so much that he gave his Son.  We must share God's love with each other.

Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP. Parochial Vicar, Assoc. Director Catholic Community at Stanford
Father's day
June 11, 2016

This special mass is offered to celebrate the accomplishments over years of study, through the good times and the hard times, the joys and the disappointments that characterize the awesome Stanford experience for our remarkable students, and to thank the faculty and staff for their dedication and love poured out and into them.  We also conferred Fr. Tierney awards to two students and one permanent member of the CCAS for being especially wonderful instruments of Christ's joy in loving others.  Fr. Xavier reminds us that the sinner in today's gospel was forgiven by Jesus, and that is a model for us to follow.

fFr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Graduation Mass
June 5, 2016

In the Gospel reading for today, Jesus brings a dead man back to life.  Similarly, our faith impacts every one around us and our love can be a message that changes others' lives completely.  

Fr. Joe Kim, Vocations Director, San Jose Archdiocese
Faith
May 29, 2016

As the students of the CC@S prepare for finals, we are reminded of the important lessons that will be on the test.  1.  Simply put- Follow Jesus.  Make your circle bigger, to care about thoe outside your close friends as well.  2.  Emulate success, understand others through Jesus' eyes.  In this year of mercy, it is all about caring for the needs of all, through prayer and connecting with Christ, and offering up your prayers for a deeper understanding of what it means to "do this in remembrance of Me."

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Corpus hristi, Body and Blood
May 22, 2016

The age-old question- what is God like?  We know God delights in the human race, and he loves each of us.  Love is a relationship, and we need to make time for God to love us, and for us to return that love through prayer, good works and joy in the things of our lives- people and all of creation.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Holy Trinity
May 17, 2016

 

How does the Catholic faith address the pernicious effects of racism still prevelant in our society? Where does Catholicism intersect with activism, solidarity, and liberation with and for the oppressed in America and beyond? What can we do, inspired by religion, to critically examine our consciences and culture, learn about our privilege, and combat social issues that affect all of us?  

Panel discussion moderated by Mathew Gonzalez and including the first black Catholic priest ordained in Northern California, Fr. Jay Matthews, Rector of Cathedral of Christ the Light in Oakland, and other religious and lay panelists.

CC@S Newman Nights
Newman Nights
May 15, 2016

Today we celebrate with great joy the Biptisms of eight membrtrs of the Catholic Community at Stanford:  Marie Claire Sara Álvarez, Addison Mary Argüelles, Max Francesco Del Vecchio, Mario Kaleo Garibay III, Gabriella Michelle Nady, Andrew Moore Pattarelli, Genevieve Quinn, Luca Isaac Seniawski, and Aleksander Skrzypacz. 

CC@S
Baptism
May 17, 2016

Pentecost marks the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles.  It reminds us that we sometimes live in a small world, fenced in by fears and doubts, and that we can let the Spirit bring us out of our confined spaces.  "Send forth the Spirit and renew the face of the earth."

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
April 17, 2016

On this Good Shepard Sunday, we ponder what it means to be watched over by Jesus. We realize that a relationship with Jesus means so much more than being a member of his flock.  We need to listen to his voice in our everyday life, practice being his follower, enable and enrich others.  Do I want to be one with God?

Preacher Fr. Xavier, with commentary from Catholic Leadership Team member Claire.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Good Shepard Sunday
April 10, 2016

Jesus asks Peter, "Do you love me?  Feed my sheep.",  We are called every day to transform our lives to a deeper level of commitment to loving Jesus and therefore others.  Make time every day for prayer with Jesus.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar, Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter, Love
April 3, 2016

The disciples had locked the door in fear of the authorities, when Jesus appeared to them.  We also live in constant fear. But Christ's greeting of "Peace be with you", means that God's mercy is with us; the Church is a society of the forgiven, and we must always make it a society of forgiveness as well.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Mercy, Easter
March 27, 2016

As Spring quarter starts at Stanford with its lighter mood, we are invited to deepend our commitment of loving others as Christ and the Father love us.  We can continue to devote 1%- 15 minutes- of each day to prayer, for others, and for ourselves.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter
March 25, 2016

How shall we make the Passion of our Lord real this year? The power of the cross can both comfort and make change in your life. We pray for the Spirit to guide our journey.

 

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial VIcar/Associate Director of the Cathoic Community at Stanford
Passion, Good Friday
March 26, 2016

The Resurrection story was hard to believe then, and remains hard.  But Jesus' death has set us free: Ihr sind frei.  Love radically and embrace the new life our Savior gave us.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter, resurrection
March 20, 2016

After the reading of the Passion of our Lord, what is there to say? Juast this:  We can use the palms to remind us of our journey this Lent- how we've grown, and ultimately who we are.  Jesus loves us so much he gave his life for us.  Are we willing to be that loving to others?

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Palm Sunday
March 13, 2016

The theme today is Mercy Abounds, as exemplified by Christ's forgiveness of the woman caught in adultry. In this time of academic examination, we examine our goals,while we seek the ultimate goal- receiving God's mercy, and showering that mercy on others.

Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/ Associate Director Catholic Community at Stanford
mercy, Lent
March 6, 2016

We continue the Lenten theme of "Beyond Chocolate: deepening our commitment to Jesus", with an exploration of Mercy.  Jesus spoke about the Father's forgivemess of the prodigal son, and Fr. Xavier discusses how that mercy is an example for us.  When we look at others with eyes of mercy, we spread Jesus' love to others.

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
February 28, 2016

Lent is more than giving up sweets and doing penance- it is really about a change of heart and mind, becoming more compassionate and loving towards God's creatures. Like the servant in the Gospel, Jesus loves us and is willing to give us a second chance.  We should look for the little acts of kindnes every day, that signifies transformation towards becoming loving people of God.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Transformation, metanoia
February 21, 2016

On this second Sunday of Lent, we are called to deepen our committment to follow Jesus.  Specifically, when we pray, we can open our prayer to others, and pray together- friends take care of friends.  This Lent, let Jesus be your friend.

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Lent, prayer
February 14, 2016

On this Valentine's day, love is in our hearts.  For someone really special, you'll go all out to show them your love.  God loves you in that special way too.  God so loved you that he gave his son to you.  This Lenten season, we are invited to spend 1% of our day (15 minutes) in prayer; love Jesus in your heart, FOREVER!.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associatee Director, CC@S
love, forever
January 31, 2016

Love is a verb!  It is hard work, it expands outward, and you must give your love to others.  

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director, Catholic Community at Stanford
Love
January 31, 2016

The Catholic Community at Stanford welcomes with great joy the newest members of our faith community: Minh-Ahn Jane Kirkpatrick, Madison Le Palacio, Ariadne Sophia Monstsvicius, Parker Chase Pachkovsky, Benjsmin Max Quezada, and Arya Nalala Thurlow. Let Christ's light burn brightly forever in you!

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Baptism
January 24, 2016

Jesus' shortest homily: "The sriptures have been fulfilled."  We complete this story through our good works. We are called to be missionaries, and to share the mercy God has shown us.  

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Mercy, shortest homily
January 17,2016

What does love look like?  It is many things, and it can be hard.  Our best example is to look at Jesus, for his is an extravagent love. Connor describes his transformative experience of the Arche Community in Seattle. 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, and Connor
Love, Cana
January 5, 2016

This talk is by noted author Brother Sean D. Sammon, in which he asks whether we wonder- "Where am I going in life? How am I using or wasting my gifts? Does anyone really care about me?  On whom or what do I set my heart?"  If we do not have healthy self-esteem, we may experience shame, inferiorty feelings and helplessness. We may go through life cycles in which some feelings may recur.  Bro. Sammon explores these topics and more, concluding with faith and spirtuality in your life.

Brother Sean D. Sammon, FMS
Sammon, Imposter Syndrome, Newman Nights
January 3, 2016

The Magi followed the star to find the newborn Jesus.  They exhibited three characterstics thst are good models for us to follow- 1.  They were risk-takers, willing to defy Roman rulers; 2.  They were truth seekers and willing to share the truth with others; 3,  They were generous, giving to Jesus things worthy of our savior, not a newborn.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, and Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain
Epiphany, Magi
December 20, 2015

Our Mother Mary traveled 78 miles to visit her cousin Elizabeth, when she heard Elizabeth was pregnant at an old age.  She brought light and joy to her cousin, and is an example of how we can bring God to others throuh our presence.  On this winter solstice, as we wait for the celebration of our Savier's birth, may you bring God's light to someone else, too.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Mary, Elizabeth, Light
December 5, 2015

In this season of waiting for the celebration of Christ's birth on the vigil of the 2nd Sunday in Advent, we pause to remember those affected by terrorism and other man-made calamities.  We remember that because God loves us deeply, we must pass on that love to everyone, even our "enemies".

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, and Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain
Early holiday liturgy, 2nd Sunday of Advent
November 29, 2015

Advent is a time of preparation, of waiting for the coming of Christ in our hearts.  We must redouble our efforts to pray that God will give us the courage to love our brothers and sisters more each day

Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CC@S
Advent, preparation
November 22, 2015

Christ was really an "un-king", because he acted very *not* like a king. He loved the poor, the outcasts.  His vision of success was not of worldliness, but rather of the Kingdom of God, which is not a place, but a state of being.  You must love the downtrodden.  If you want to be in the kingdom of God you must work for it, not just pray for it.

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, and Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain
Kingdom, King
November 15, 2015

What truly matters is that we are sons and daughters of God- God's beloved, whom he loves deeply.  We can't forget this despite the pressures of modern life with hedonism, fundamentalism and the chaos of terrorism.  It is in chaos that Christ died for us, and in chaos we must seek God.

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Beloved, Loved, Chaos
November 12, 2015

The canonized saints are very easy to be devoted to, as they have been recognized for their beauty in the Church's eyes.  But Fr. Xavier and Teresa point out that there are saints all around us, that God loves just as much- the peace makers, the caregivers, those who give joy to others. May we all rest in God's peace.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director CCAS, Teresa Pleins, Chaplain
Saints
October 25, 2015

Too often we are passive listeners at Mass.  But as members of the one body, we are called to be active participants in the celebration.  Remember that Christ is present where we are gathered, and act accordingly.  Following Fr. Taylor's homily, Trish Bolle tells a story of her missionary work in China, and invites us to be part of the lay ministry, Spirit of Mission.

Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CC@S & Trish Bolle, Lay Minister
Active participation, lay ministry
October 11, 2015

"What must I do to inherent the kingdom of heaven?", the rich man asked Jesus, and Jesus replied "You must sell it all and give to the poor."  But it's not just about money- many of us are rich in the everyday business of life- succsess, growth, even piety.  Student CC@S leader Steven Howell tells us to take ten minutes of our busy-ness this week and just listen to God.  

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, Pastoe/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford & Steven Howell.
Busy, rich
October 4, 2015

Two rules for today:  1.  Make rejoicing in the Lord your strength; 2.  Be a gift to someone else.  Reaching out to others and taking a risk in caring for them will allow you to belong to Jesus.  That is what He did for us, in great pain and personal suffering.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director , Catholic Community at Stanford
Rejoicing, gifts
September 27, 2015

We sometimes form exclusive clubs, which can have terrible consequences for those "left outside the circle". We should explore God within a highly inclusive group, as the CC@S is fostering this year through the  student leadership. Seek a small community within which to find God, and therefore yourself.

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS
Community, inclusion
September 20, 2015

In the Gospel today, we hear that to follow Jesus, you must receive the little child, i.e. the poor, the hungry, the helpless.  We are thus called to bring Jesus to others, and it begins today with the undergrads at Stanford, who are forming prayer/discussion groups..

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster and Director, Catholic Community at Stanford
evangelizing
September 13, 2015

"Who do *you* say I am?", asked Jesus of his disciples.  We need to be able to answer that question for ourselves, because we are to be the catalyst that helps our neighbor find Christ.  The CC@S will be embarking on a journey of evangelixing, led by our students this year.

 

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, O.P., Parochial Vica and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Evangelizing
September 6, 2015

The gospel story of the deaf & dumb man who was healed by Jesus' touch illustrates the power of touch. When you greet people this week, touch them with the reverence they deserve, for they are God's holy creation.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stnford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stnford
Touch
August 30, 2015

Hypocrites are focused on the appearance of holiness rather than truly loving God and His people. This week, be doers of the word, not hearers of the word, and do one good thing for the world, one person at a time.

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan

Deacon John Kerrigan
Hypocrites
August 30, 2015

The Catholic Community at Stanford welcomes our newest members of the faith baptised on Sunday August 30, with great joy. 

Presider: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the CC@S

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS
Baptisms
August 23, 2015

The leadership of the Catholic Community at Stanford has just returned from an evangelical retreat, and is planning a campaign for our parrish.  When we receive Jesus, we become an apostle, and we must be prepared to tell others why, and invite them to also become discuples/apostles.

Preachers: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP and Chaplain Terresa Pleins.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP and Chaplain Terresa Pleins.
disciples, apostles
August 9, 2015

We celebrate the Feast of St. Dominic today.  Simply put, he was a holy man who loved everyone, and showered love and offered God's discipleship to all he met.  He was a wonderful singer and brought joy to all people.  Fr. Xavier exhorts us to follow St. Dominic's example and preach the Good News as a member of the Order of Preachers.  Your love of others makes a difference in the world.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director Catholic Community at Stanford
St. Dominic
August 2, 2015

This week is a continuation of the theme on the transforming grace that Jesus gives us, through the gift of his body and blood. When we eat His body and drink His blood, we are transformed into Jesus.  Aside from the body and blood in the Eucharist, the person next to us is the most holy and precious object in the room, becuase that person is Jesus. 

Preacher: Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, O.P.

Fr. Emmanuel Taylor, O.P., Parochial Vica and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
transforming grace
July 26, 2015

Jesus provided figurative as well as physical nourishment for the crowds when he multiplied the loavses and fishes.  We are invited this week to share God's blessings with others and to be grateful for all that we are given by others in our own spiritual refreshment.

Preacher: Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP

Fr. Emmanual Taylor, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CC@S
Loaves & fishes, sharing, refreshment
July 19, 2015

Jesus is a good shephard who "gather" us together and "lead" us to justice. Are you following the good shephard or the shephards who scatter us? 

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan

Deacon John Kerrigan
Shepherd, leadership
July 12, 2015

Fr. Nathan describes how God's calling changed his life from campus ministry to helping "wounded warriers".  We may find that when we are also attentive to God's call, our life's diretion can take on new meaning. When we are restless, it could be God telling you to listen to His new plan for you.

Preacher Fr. Nathan Castle, OP.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP. Adjunct Staff of the Catholic Community.
God's call
July 5, 2015

Jesus was sanctioned because he stuck out and was thought to be trying to be better than his family.  We are called to become the Good News for others.  To do so, we must play to our strengths, because as we shine out, we enable others around us to share in that divinity.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Shine, Love
June 28, 2015

This is Fr. Daniel's last mass at Stanford.

If you are hurting, broken, and wounded, open your hearts and have faith. We need Jesus, and His healing will happen to us.  

 

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS. 

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS
Healing, faith
June 21, 2015

Why does God not abolish suffering?  If he did, we would not have the chance to demonstrate our gifts of grace and love.  We could not be the heroes that we are on a routine basis.  God gives us the choice to love or ignore his call, and he will never take that choice away. On this Father's day, we salute fathers and father figures as heroes.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
love, suffering, Fathers
June 13, 2015

Graduates, and all of us, have a purpose in life.  Jesus is eerywhere, waiting for us to find him, and we must be Chrsit for everyone we meet. The homily was given by Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford, and it is followed by awards given to student leaders Matt and Hannah.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Graduation 2015
June 7, 2015

On this day we specially celebrate the real presence of Christ when we receie communion.  His body and blood reside within us, and we are therefore required to love each other as much as God loves us.  We must be respectful when receiving communion.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS.

 

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS
Corpus Christi, body and blood
May 24, 2015

Fr. Daniel brings us a message from the Pope in Rome: "Do not be afraid", applied to the concept of marriage. Marriage requires work and trust, but the Holy Spirit will change us and guide us, and the world is better off when people love. This is the connection with Pentecost- receiving the Spirit and acting upon the call.

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Penetecost, afraid, marriage
May 17, 2015

Luke decribes the ascension of Jesus in two very different ways- in today's gospel bystanders are simply dumbfounded and unable to do anything but stare, while in the Acts, the observers are ready to go and evangelize, acting out their belief in Christ.  How do we resond?  Are we ready to feed on the joy of the Risen Presence?

Today, we also celebrate the Sacrament of Confirmation for Davide Candes, MinHee Chung, Katherine Kane, Jorge Pleins, Ben Scheve and Maddie Wachhorst.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Ascension, COnfirmation
May 10, 2015

The theme of this mass is simple- God is love.  He sent his only Son to expiate our sins.  He loves us, and unless we love God we are nothing. On this Mother's day Teresa reminds us that love may not be simple, but it must be kind, patient and given freely.

Preachers: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director and Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director and Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the CCAS
Love, God, expiate
April 30, 2015

Sixty years after the death of the great Jesuit paleontologist and theologian Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Professor Ursula King presents an examination of his mysticism based on science and the spiritual richness of evolution and modern cosmology.

Ursula King, STL (Paris), MA (Delhi), PhD (London), FRSA, is Professor Emerita of Theology and Religious Studies and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Bristol. She has published numerous books and articles, especially on gender issues in religions; method and theory; modern Hinduism; interfaith dialogue; spirituality; and the thought of Teilhard de Chardin.

Ursula King
Newman Nights, Teilhard de Chardin, Ursula King
April 25, 2015

The Good Shepard has our back.  Just as Jesus loved his flock, the sinners, the lowly, those unloved by society, we must love all our brothers and sisters.  God loves us unconditionally, and since Christ is in us in the bread and wine, we can not help but be shepards to others.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community
Good Shepard
April 19, 2015

Why did Jesus have to die and suffer so deeply?  He poured his life into suffering in order to show us how very much God loves us, and to give us new life in that love.  If we truly believed how much God loves us, wouldn't it change our perception of suffering, with God looking over our shoulder?

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
April 1, 2015

This liturgy (the Octave of Easter) is devoted to the theme of mercy, and is called Divine Mercy Sunday, after Christ appeared to Sr. Faustina in 1935 to promise God's infinite mercy on all sinners.  We are enjoined to share that mercy with others in our community.

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan.

Deacon John Kerrigan.
mercy, octave of Easter
April 5, 2015

When you love someone, you want to share the good news!  That is the message of the resurrection- your love of God compels you to share the news that death has been overcome by Jesus' rising from the dead. Go forth and share your Good News with those around you.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CCAS.

Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director, CCAS.
Easter, Resurrection
April 4, 2015

Our job, simply put, is to share the good news of the resurrection.  Make God visible to others.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCaS.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCaS.
Easter vigil, resurrection
April 3, 2015

Have we become jaded by all the terrible news covered in the media?  Do we no longer grieve when we hear of someone's death?  Everyone is special, created in the likeness of God, whom Christ loves even unto dying himself, willingly, to save us from our sins.  We must learn to love again, and treat all as though they are deserving of our love, because they are.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community

Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community
Good Friday, Passion
April 2, 2015

Jesus gave his body and blood to all, even to the one whom He knew would betray him, and shocked people by eating with sinners and others.  When he washed his disciples' feet, this symbol was recognized as a demeaning act, and so this process of touching another on his knees was a deep expression of Christ's love for everyone, and an example for us we can't ignore.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Holy Thursday, Lord's Supper
March 22, 2015

Do we dream of a love that never dies?  God has an undying love for us, and he wants us to pour out our love for others, as Jesus did when he died on the cross for us.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Love, Dreams
March 15, 2015

In the Gospel today, Jesus cures the blind man, and as the Pharisees question him, his faith gradually grows. He starts with "I do not know how he cured me", to "He is from God".  God sees us through our heart, not by outward appearances.  If we see but do not love God, we too are blind.  Let us see the goodness in our days and thank God for these many graces.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Directr of the Catholic Community of Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Directr of the Catholic Community of Stanford
Blind man, sight, seeing
March 8, 2015

The readings today are all about thirst and yearning.The woman at the well represents all of us.  Do we seek the living water that Jesus offers, or are we looking for self-esteem, financial net worth, social status?  Let us draw from the well that will not make us thirst again.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
March 1, 2015

In biblical times, sacrificial offerings for religious purposes were common; thus God's test of Abraham was not outlandish. This Genesis story is a metaphor for God the Father offering his Son to redeem the world, through Christ's death. Grace Chiarella also shared her experience as a mentor.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Abraham, Isaac, sacrifice
February 24, 2015

 

Are religion and science irreconcilable enemies? For example, what do we in the Catholic Church teach about Evolution? Professor John Haught addresses this issue here. A prolific author (Making Sense of Evolution, Deeper Than Darwin: The Prospect for Religion in the Age of Evolution), engaging speaker, and highly respected scholar (Senior Fellow Emeritus, Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University), Professor Haught discusses some of the thorny issues surrounding the topic of evolution and religion.

 

Prof. John Haught
Darwin, Evolution, Intelligent Design
February 22, 015

The readings are all about water today, which reminds us of our Baptism and God's promise to be with us.  Do we accept that promise with prayer and repentnce this lent?  After Jesus was baptised, he was driven into the desert and beset with demons and thirst.  We too are under pressure from many 'deserts', but know that the angels of God are always with us if we only seek God.

Preachers: Fr. Daniel Roland, OP and Teresa Pleins, Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP and Teresa Pleins, Catholic Community at Stanford
Lent, water, baptism
February 21, 2015

This symposium addresses Christian values and the common good in response to Cardinal Marx's Lecture.  There are four parts, presented in 2 podcast segments.  Part 1:  Keynotee address by Robert W. McElroy, Auxialiary Bishop of the Archdiocese of San Francisco- Themes from Pope Francis on the international Common Good. Part 2: Panel 1- Theologians Respond, Profs. David DeCosse, Kristin Heyer, William O'Neil.  Part 3: Panel 2-  The Economists Respond, Profs. Alain Enthoven, John Taylor, Jerry Porras.  Part 4:  Panel 3- How do we respond?  Rev. John Kerrigan, Kevin Hartigan, Rosie La Puma, Lauve Gladstone.

This is Segment 1: Bishop McElroy and Panel 1.

Catholic Community at Stanford
Symposium, Common Good, Heyns Lecture, Cardinal Marx
February 21, 2015

This symposium addresses Christian values and the common good in response to Cardinal Marx's Lecture. There are four parts, presented in 2 podcast segments. Part 1: Keynotee address by Robert W. McElroy, Auxialiary Bishop of the Archdiocese of San Francisco- Themes from Pope Francis on the international Common Good. Part 2: Panel 1-Theologians Respond, Profs. David DeCosse, Kristin Heyer, William O'Neil. Part 3: Panel 2- The Economists Respond, Profs. Alain Enthoven, John Taylor, Jerry Porras. Part 4: Panel 3- How do we respond? Rev. John Kerrigan, Kevin Hartigan, Rosie La Puma, Lauve Gladstone.

This is Segment 2: Panels 2 and 3.

Catholic Community at Stanford
Symposium, Common Good, Heyns Lecture, Cardinal Marx
February 18, 2015

We receive ashes on this, the first day of Lent.  They remind us that we are nothing without God, and we must undergo prayer, almsgiving, and fasting as penance for our sins.  It is a time of renewal for us, a time to make changes in our lives.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community

 

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community
Ash Wednesday, Lent, Repent
February 15, 2015

The readings remind us that lepers in Christ's time were made to feel unclean and treated as outcasts, yet Jesus chose to touch them and make them well.  How do we need to be made clean?  By serving others we respond to God's call to fellowship with each other.  We can make that choice this Lent!

Preacher:  Fr. Danial Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Danial Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Leper, service, Lent
February 8, 2015

Job was beset with loss of his posessions and his 10 sons and daughters, yet he remained steadfast in his trust and faith in God, and God restored his life.  Jesus reached out and touched people, healing and teaching with his hands.  Are we able to be touched by God like Job and those who sought Christ's healing?  Are we "touchers", too?  We need to make our priorities align with those of God.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community
Job, Faith
February 1, 2015

In the 1960's "We shall overcome" was a popular rallying cry against injustice, but it is still relevant today.  We are called to overcome the fear that keeps us from helping others when poverty, ignorance, racism and other works of the devil occur.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Injustice, we shall overcome
January 25, 2015

"The Time is now", is the theme for today's liturgy.  Jesus called his disciples from the shores of Galilee, and they came immediately.  Are we repsponsive to His call, too?  Do we runtowards Him or away?

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan

Deacon John Kerrigan
time
January 18, 2015

Cardinal Reinhard Marx reflects on our vocations:  God gives us the wherewithal to choose our vocation, and we are each called to do so.  Each of us has a mission to fulfill.  Like Samuel, we are called by God.  Can you say, "Here I am, Lord"?

Cardinal Reinhard Marx
mission, vocation
January 11, 2015

Many of us are too young to remember our own baptism, but we know it confers a releif from our sins.  Today, when we celebrate the memory of Jrsus being baptised in the Jordan, we may ask why would He do this, as he is free from sin?  The answer is that he is showing us that forgiveness of our sins is a gift from God, that we must remember.  We know God has chosen us- do we accept him as fully as we should?

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Pastor of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Pastor of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Baptism
January 4, 2015

Fr. Xavier asks us to imagine we are Magi, and like the Magi of Jesus' time, we bring gifts to the world.  It is our responsibility as followers of Christ to make our gifts available to others.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Magi, Epiphany
December 21, 2014

We grew up as children learning how to make a wish and blow out the candle.  Fr. Daniel asks us today to still have goals and to dream, but also to make those wishes come true.  For nothing is impossible with the Lord.

Fr. Daniel Rolland, O.P., Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Wish, dream
December 14, 2014

In the readings today, Paul exhorts the community to Rejoice, to Pray, to be open to God.  With the celebration of Mary's Annunciation this past week, we are reminded to be as open as she was in receiving the Lord in our life. This week in Advent, be glad for Mary's loving spirit, and  ask for her help to always rejoice in the blessings and graces you receive.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Rejoice, Mary, Advent
December 6, 2014

Fr. Xavier asks: "How do you hear the meaning in 'Prepare the way of the Lord?'".  Is it in the wars, poverty, the enormity of social unrest in the world, the eyes of those you meet? The answer is yes, the way of the lord is everywhere.  Grace, love and Christ are only effective if we act, grace needs to be put into action; and we need to look into the eyes of Jesus within others.

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Early holiday liturgy
November 23, 2014

Fr. Xavier reminds us that imagination is important to us as believers in Christ, our King, and asks how we respond to God as the good Shepard?

Chplain Teresa Pleins suggests that the gospel reading of whom we fed and clothed and cared for requires that we truly open our eyes to the needs all around us, and act. We are all called to contriute to the kingdom.

Fr. Xavier Lavaggeto, Teresa Pleins, Catholic Community at Stanford
Shepard, King, Service
November 16, 2014

We are entrusted with the greatest gift of all, God's love, as well as the talents He gave us.  Use your gifts wisely.  Do not bury them out of fear, but go boldly into the world and enrich others.  If you fail to act, there will be gnashing of teeth.

Preacher Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Talents, gifts, wailing
November 11, 2014

Prof. David Pleins, from Santa Clara University, explores the question of justice from the standpoint of the Hebrew Bible, and points out the 3 year cycle of the Lectionary tells only a partial story.

Prof. David Pleins, Santa Clara University
Newman Night, Hebrew Bible, Lectionary
November 9, 2014

In John's gospel reading today, Jesus throws the merchants and money changers out of the Temple, telling the Jews that he has authority from his Father.  We need to pour God into the deepest part of our heart, throgh discernment for our calling, respectful dialog about the meaning of our faith, and awareness of the poor and disadvantaged.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Cleansing the temple, money changers
November 2, 2014

Fr. Xavier describes how he will be glad to go to Purgatory, because it is a time of spirtual healing, learning to love like Christ and prepare us for the awesome love of the trinity in heaven.  It is not a punishment, but a purifying journey for which we should be glad.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP Paster/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
All Souls Day, Purgatory
October 14, 29014

In this Newman Nights series, Holy Names University Prof. Robert Lasalle-Klein, author of the book "Blood and Ink. Ignacio Ellacuría, Jon Sobrino, and the Jesuit Martyrs of the University of Central America", presents the history and context of the Jesuit martyrs in El Salvador, and the changes in radical leadership that developed from the suffering peoples.

Prof. Robert Lasalle-Klein, Holy Names University
Jesuits, martyrs, El Salvador
October 12, 2014

God invites all of us to his banquest, but those who do not accept or those who are not properly prepared ("have not put on the wedding garments") will be thrown out of the feast.  Put on God every day in your heart.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Many are chosen, banquet
October 5, 2014

We ask for God's blessings, but we are already constantly blessed by the Holy Spirit. How often do we stop to acknowledge the gifts given us? We would do well to appreciate the grace we take for granted.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Holy Spirit, gifts, grace
September 28, 2014

Jesus asks "Who is the good son, the one who said 'no' to his father but went, or the son who said 'yes' but didn't go?  It was considered a disgrace to say 'no' to your father, but that son follwed his father's will.  Our actions and words should match.  Heaven is for those who love the Father.

'Preaher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
saying yes
September 14, 2014

We embrace the cross because of what it signifies in our faith life- the resurrection.  The cross was an instrument of death, which Christ's actions turned into a triumphant rebirth in the life of God. We are invited today to think of those times when we experienced a death in our lives and the spiritual rebirth that followed.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Cross, resurrection, rebirth
September 7, 2014

It is often hard for us to confront someone who has offended us, but Jesus telss us to do so, in order to save that person.  We are responsible for our neighbors, whom we must love as ourselves.

Preachers:  Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, Pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford, Teresa Pliens, Chaplain.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, Pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford, Teresa Pliens, Chaplain.
Love, Neighbor
August 31, 2014

On this labor day weekend, we are supposed to rest from accumulating our "stuff".  Jesus reminds us that worldly possessions are not of lasting value; they can be gone quickly in an earthquake.  If we are to have lasting life we must take up our crosses and follow Him.

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Daniel Roland, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Take up your cross, stuff
August 24, 2014

We are all like Peter, a Rock upon which the church is built.  We must trust in Christ as Peter did; like Peter, sometimes we fall, too.  But we are charged to be that rock to someone today, and through the week.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Cathollic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Paster/Director of the Cathollic Community at Stanford
Rock, Peter
August 17, 2014

The Canaanite women persisted in her faith that Jesus could cure her daughter. We too must be tireless in seeking God's help and trusting in his love for us.  Slow down, accept God's creation and listen to your heart through others.

Preacher: Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Rev. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Canaanite woman, persistence
August 10, 2014

Peter walks on water until his faith fails, and Jesus saves him. When Peter gets back in the boat Jesus calms the sea. Indeed Jesus lives in the quiet of our hearts, which can act to dispel the noise of the world, the earthquakes, the winds, the wars and the evil terror. Let us see the good in the quiet whisperings of God in our lives.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto and Chaplain Teresa Pleins, Catholic Community at Stanford 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto and Chaplain Teresa Pleins, Catholic Community at Stanford
Storms, quiet
July 20, 2014

As in the parable of the wheat and weeds that were sown together, we are all joined as one, the weak, the vulnerable,and the strong. God loves each of us as his children.

Preacher: Reverand John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Reverand John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Parable of Wheat, weeds.
July 13, 2014

The gospel recalls the parable of the mustard seed, which perishes if not sown on good soil, and Fr. Lavagetto asks what kind of seed are we?  Are we open to God's call to be one with all our brothers and sisters as Jesus wants?

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Pastor/Director of Catholic Community at Stanford
mustard seed, soil
July 6, 2014

It is Fr. Daniel's first Sunday mass at Stanford University. In today's gospel Jesus syas "Come to me, all who burdened, I will give you rest." If your life is wearysome, Jesus invites us today to connect with Him, who brings us peace not only here but also to eternity. 

Preacher: Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director, Catcholic Community at Stanford

Note: I'm sorry about the low quality of the sound this time. 

Fr. Daniel Rolland, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director, Catcholic Community at Stanford
burden, rest, yoke
June 29, 2014

Peter and Paul were not perfect, yet Jesus loved them despite their failings, just as he loves us.  Both saints sought to know Jesus. Tips for knowing Jesus: 1.  Read a bit of the gospels every day; 2.  Take time to pray; 3. Choose a characteristic of Jesus and try to emulate; 4. Look for Jesus in others; 5. Like Jesus, be a neighbor to others.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of CCAS
Saints, Peter, Paul
June 22, 2014

On this Feast of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, we are reminded that together we all are the one Body of Christ.  When we eat his body and drink his blood, he is in us, which means that everyone else is also within us. We are the face of Christ to others, and Christ takes on our appearance to them.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Corpus Christi, Body, Blood
June 14, 2014

Fr. Nathan examines relevant words on this graduation weekend:  Leland = Le- Land = plowed field, i.e. a field ready to be planted, to bear fruit, true of graduates. Stanford = Stone Ford, i.e. a way to cross an obstacle like a river; we can be that bridge for others.  Graduate = gradient, slope, degree; i.e. a climbing, and asceding or descending as we make our way through life. Over all, God told Moses, "I Am", i.e. the trinity is always, ever, and infinte.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Trinity, Leland Stanford, Graduate
June 8, 2014

Pentecost is the birthday of the church, the culmination of the Easter season that began on Ash Wednesday. Deacon John speaks about opening doors and diversity.  Baptisms of 6 children today are the door to the church for them.  The hardest door for us to open is the door to our heart, but the Spirit will work through our prayers to open it for us.

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan, CHaplain of the Catholic Community.

Deacon John Kerrigan, CHaplain of the Catholic Community.
Pentecost, birthday, door
June 1, 2014

Before Jesus ascends into heaven to be with God the Father, he directs his disciples, "Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations." So too, we are called to evangelize- to bring joy to others.

Preachers: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP and Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Commnity at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP and Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Commnity at Stanford
ascension, evangelize
May 25, 2014

A popular bumper sticker says, "God is my co-pilot".  But Jesus doesn't want to be beside us, he wants us to take Him into our heart, to live within us.  As we prepare for Pentecost, can we make that pledge today?

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catholic Community at Stanford

This was Fr. Nathan's last sermon as Pastor of the CCAS. We will miss him and wish him Godspeed in his new role of serving God's people. Thank you, Fr. Nathan for your seven years of love, guidance and spirituality amongst us.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catholic Community at Stanford
"God is my co-pilot", Farewell Fr. Nathan
May 18, 2014

Jesus teaches us how to see, and unlike Descartes, it is not as "I am", but through "We are". He loves us, and wants us to love each other.  Having seen Christ, we have also seen God the Father.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Seeing
May 18, 2014

The Catholic Community at Stanford celebrates the baptisms of Conor Banks, Eva Caldera, Steven Caldera III, Margaret Carter, McKenzie Chan, William Hart IV, Luke Furtado, and Natalie Pearce, and welcomes them into our community with great joy.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor of the CCAS
Baptisms, CCAS
May 11, 2014

Jesus provides abundance right at the moment when we thought it was impossible. The challenge is that we need to go to our darkest part of our life in order to be the part of cycle of death and rebirth. Look at where in this world is the hardest to live your life. Would you let God there or would you rather keep stumbling under your own power? 

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catholic Community at Stanford. 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catcholic Community at Stanford
Abundance
May 4, 2014

In the Gospel reading, Jesus does three things: asks the disheartened disciples on the way to Emmaus about the events in Jerusalem and listens to them; interprets the scriptures for them, and reveals himself in the breaking of the bread. As Easter People, we must ask the Spirit for help when we are disheartend, and our hearts will burn with the light of Christ.

Preacher: Bishop Daly, San Jose Archdiocese

Bishop Daly, San Jose Archdiocese
Easter, Emmaus
April 27, 2014

Thomas believed Jesus had risen only after he saw the wounds inflicted by crucifiction. Tragedy can sometimes make disbelievers of us, too. But God is always with us, and that srength can allow us to bring His relief to others. On this Sunday of Divine Mercy, let us think of one way we can bring divine mercy to someone else this week.

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Doubting Thomas, Divine Mercy
April 19, 2014

We enter the darkened church tonight as if proceding into a tomb, symbolizing some part of us that is dead.  We receive the new light of Christ, and we seek his grace in the form of seven virtues- the gifts of Wisdom, Understanding, KKnowledge, Counsel, Piety, Courage, and Awe.  He is risen, and we are reborn.

Preacher:  Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catcholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Catcholic Community at Stanford
Easter, Vigil
April 18, 2014

Through the Passion, Jesus experienced the full range of possible human experiences, from the good to the bad. His sacred heart expands to receive our trials and concerns, our joys and death itself. Jesus knows what it feels like and is with us, in us always.

Preacher- Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCaS.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCaS
The Passion Commemoration, Good Friday
April 17, 2014

On this most holy night, Jesus became servant to his disciples and showed the way for them to behave, by washing their feet. Instead of the great and powerful leader the people were looking for in their Messiah, Jesus became the lowest of the lowly. Can it really be that God loves us infinitely?

 Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

 

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
April 6, 2014

This Sunday's Gospel is John's story of Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead, about which Fr. Nathan annotates several aspects of the readings. One annotation is Jesus telling his disciples that they must go to awaken Lazarus, but the disciples baulk for fear of being stoned.  Jesus says one may stumble while traveling at night without light, but if Christ is in you the light is in you and you will not fall.   

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Lazarus
March 16, 2014

Mountains are midway between heaven and earth and play a special role in Jesus' life.  Jesus was transfigured on a high mountain, and a voice from heaven announced, "This is my Son, in whom I am well pleasdd." As Jesus said Yes to the Father, we too must transform in this eason of lent, leaving our old ways of sinning and following Christ, showing mercy to our enemies and loving all.

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Transfiguration, mountain, Lent
March 11, 2014

How do we live Gospel values, especially when they are counter-cultural? Does our prevailing economic model leave people behind? How, exactly do we care for God’s poor and marginalized?

For our final Newman Nights session of the year, Larry Purcell, Director of Catholic Worker House in Redwood City, CA discusses the Catholic Worker movement to help us find ways to live the gospel’s preferential option for those affected by poverty.

 

 

Larry Purcell, Director of Catholic Worker House in Redwood City, CA
Catholic Worker House, Poverty, marginalized
March 9, 2014

After being baptised, Jesus spends 40 days in the desert, and is tempted three ways by the devil- to make bread from stones, to throw himself from the pinacle without fear, and to worship the devil in return for ultimate power. Like Jesus, we should strive to be hungry, to be fearful and to be meek.  By doing good works this Lent we will rebuke the devil and invite Jesus to be our partner on the journey.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Lent, Devil, temptation
March 5, 2014

God sees us as fresh and new. Don't wallow in guilt this Lent, for Lent is a journey towads Easter. Rather, we should try to become better people. On Ash Wednesday, we mark our heads with ashes to show our mortality. And when we wash them off the next day, we are all fresh and new, as God sees us. "Without courage, compassion fails. Without compassion, courage has no direction." This Lent, we should strive to live like Jesus with compassion, guided by courage.

 

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS
Ash Wednesday, Lent, Compassion, Courage
March 4, 2014

Where do we meet the real Jesus?  In the paes of scholarly books that provide a historical reconstruction? If we believe in the resurrection, then we also believe we encounter the Living Jesus in many ways, not least within the life of the chuch. This presentation shows how rich and complex coming to know Jesus can be.

Speaker:  Dr. Luke Timothy Johnson, Commonweal Lecturer

Dr. Luke Timothy Johnson, Commonweal Lecturer
Learning Jesus, Resurrection
March 2, 2014

We are broken and we are sinners, but we are two things more. We are forgiven and we are loved. Our shared flesh is Jesus' body; our shared life, His blood. Altogether we are the Church. Our holiness is of God's doing. The forgiveness we receive is only as great as the forgiveness we give. This Lent, we are called to let the Spirit teach us how to see people, deeply, for who they really are.

 

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS
forgiveness, love, Lent, body, blood
February 23, 2014

Holiness isn't a private affair, rather it is a communal responsibility. You cannot be holy by yourself. Paul says we are all God's temples, and God's spirit dwells in us.  Jesus challenges us to always love. How many ways are there to build up temples? To build up the Kingdom?

 

Preacher: Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Community

Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Community
Holy, Holiness, Temple, Kingdom
February 18, 2014

Exams!  Stresses!  Pressures!  Demands!  How can I keep sane when everyone around me is acting like loons?  What happens when I am one of the loons?  Presented by Fr. Tom Weston, SJ, on how the 12 steps of recovery help us grow, develop and evolve.

Fr. Tom Weston, SJ
stress, pressure, 12 steps to recovery, Newman Nights
February 16, 2014

God wants something else for us, and that something else is peace. Jesus intentionally sets before us a road of lifelong transformation, in which we live by God's love. He wants us to share an engaging life with one another. A meaningful life begins when we are more for others than for ourselves.  When we begin to do that, we begin to live like Jesus.

 

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS
Transformation, Peace, Others
February 11, 2014

Our speaker, Professor Gary Macy from Santa Clara University, explores the topic of transubstantiation.  Do you know what the word means?

Professor Gary Macy, Santa Clara University
real presence, transubstantiation
February 9, 2014

The theme of the last several weeks has been Light, the light of Christ, and today adds the element of Salt. We are not to hide our light, but rather to use God's gifts of grace to bring that light to others.  If we do not transform our gifts into action we are like salt that is crushed under foot and discarded.

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Light, Salt
February 4, 2014

Prof. Lisa Fullam discusses sexuality from the standpoint of the cardinal virtues of self-care, justice, fidelity and prudence.  The church has long taught the "does and don'ts" of sexuality, but this lecture updates the issues from a more modern vantage. 

Prof. Lisa Fullam
Sexuality, Sex, virtues, ethics
February 2, 2014

Jesus was brought to the temple on the 40th day for the purification rite. The presence of Jesus, the one who loves you, makes all things possible.  Because i know I'm completely loved, I can go out and bring the Presence to others.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director, Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director, Catholic Community at Stanford.
Presentation of the Lord
January 28, 2014

Fr. Ron Schmit traces a brief history of the sacrament of marriage, including how the emphasis has changed since inception thousands of years before the Christian Church, concluding with the era since Vatican II in which the emphasis is on the joint spirituality of husband and wife rather than on procreation. This was a sea change since the Council of Trent.

 

Fr. Ron Schmit
Marriage, history,Vatican II
January 26, 2014

Jesus began his public ministry by calling his disciples.  The first were fishermen, who left their nets, boats and even their father to immediately follow Jesus. Mathew provides no explanation, but it lies in their choice to be adventurous, to lose their innate caution.  So too, we are called today to rethink our committment to Jesus Christ and become more fully his disciple.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director of CCAS
Fisherman, disciples
January 19, 2014

We each have a different call to serve God in our diverse ways. If we go through an active process of discernment we will draw closer to God.

Preacher: Fr. Steven Maekawa, Western Dominican Director of Vocations

Fr. Steven Maekawa, Western Dominican Director of Vocations
Discenrment, calling
January 14, 2014

This talk covers the history of the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and the eucharist from the second century until modern time, and is given by Anne Grycz.  Anne was very involved in the implementation of the revised sacraments for the Diocese of San Jose, educating pastoral staff and the local communities on the theology behind these changes.

Anne Grycz
initiation sacraments, baptism, confirmation, eucharist
January 12, 2014

During the Christmas season, we are invited to become messengers of Christ, not mere observers.  Mary accepted the service that the Spirit asked of her despite the risk she incurred, and became herself a servant, for example, by comforting her cousin. We too must take risks in the name of our Lord.  And, like the babies baptised today, we must grow in the size and weight of our spirituality.

Preacher:  Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Baptism of our Lord
January 12, 2014: the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

We welcome the newest baptized members of the CCaS with great joy:  Lionel Adriano James, Cienna Angus, Owen Biggerstaff, Emrys Robert Michael Carrasco, Shain Tiberius Carrasco, Nova Dorsey, Logan Sprague, Lucas Thach Nguyen.

Presider: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS

 

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS
Baptisms
January 5, 2014

Are you satisfied with your relationship to God?  Let this period be a time for you to experience a true epiphany: A rebirth of your faith through the Spirit.  When we say "Come Lord Jesus", we are asserting that Christ trumps over possessions, family, stock market and ritualistic adherence to religious laws.  Like the Magi, we must pay homage to God.

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of Catholic Community at Stanford

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of Catholic Community at Stanford
Epiphany, rebirth
December 25, 2013

The Christmas message is simple: Be open to true change; don't just observe life.  Like Pope Francis, we are all sinners; we fail to live up to Christ's example. But we must acknowledge our faults and make a change in our hearts; then announce the Good News to the world.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CC
Christmas, Change
December 22, 2013

Joseph faced humiliation and shame by the news that Mary was pregnant and he wasn't the father.  Nevertheless, he did the honorable thing and planned to divorce Mary quietly to spare her being branded an adulteress. The lesson for us is to alter our life as needed to walk the nobler road, so that we can act as agents to change the world by our love.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS
change, Joseph, Mary
December 15, 2013

John the Baptist was disappointed in Jesus, because He was quiet, forgiving, gentle and associated with society's outcasts.  Father Xavier calls us today to look with new meaning at the good news, to bring our intellect to bear on the true message of Advent and dwell on the 4 S's: Scripture, Saints, Sacraments, and Service.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS
Scripture, Sacraments, Service, Saints
December 7, 2013

Sign over the entrance to a small church near Stanford: "Enter at your own risk". When we open our hearts to the needs of others, we will be changed, through the power of Jesus' birth working in our hearts. The message of advent is Slow dow!- Breathe more gently, make room for change through love of our brothers and sisters, as we prepare for the celebration of Jesus coming into our hearts more fully.

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Advent, change
December 1, 2013

Today is the first day of the new liturgical year, and unlike the new calendar year that is celebrated by joyous noisemaking, it is a time for quiet reflection on how we "put Christ on", as the readings for today exhort. The first reading describes the place where God lives, while in the gospel we are reminded that the Son of Man will come at a time we do not know.  Let us greet each new day by wrapping ourselves in Christ, as we enter Advent.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Putting Christ on, Advent
November 24, 2013

Christ is the head of the church, the ruler of all.  Are you prepared to give all your trust and allegiance to Him?

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Viacar/Associate Director

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Viacar/Associate Director
Christ the King
November 19, 2013

What brings women to consider religious life, and what makes them stay?  Sister Gloria Marie Jones, O.P.,  Congregational Prioress of the Dominican Sisters of Mission San José, and Sister Ramona Bascom, O.P.,  both of whom have strong connections to the Catholic Community @ Stanford, share their own lived experience in the light of the history of religious life for women.

 

 

Sister Gloria Marie Jones, O.P. & Sister Ramona Bascom, O.P.
Women religious, Sisters
November 17, 2013

We are sometimes put in circumstances we don't understand, such as war and typhoons .  Today we are reminded that, "by your endurance you will gain your soul".  We must continue to trust in God, especially when we don't understand.

Preacher: Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the CCAS.

Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the CCAS.
Endurance, trust
November 10, 2013

As the liturgical year draws to a close the readings focus on endings. Father Nathan draws on the metaphor of a plane descending to a landing to bring us to an awareness of the resurrection and its meaning in our lives. We can share this meaning with others whose ideology may not be able to incorporate the true meaning of the end of life on earth and beginning of a new life with God.

Preacher. Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Resurrection, endings
November 5, 2013

Peter Walker from Sacred Heart Prep in Atherton, invites us to consider the Gospel of John, Chapter 9, in examining the shift in church “membership” in the late 1st century. We will look at how the passage reflects “splits” in the 1st century church.

Peter Walker, Sacred Heart Prep School, Atherton
Early Church, Gospel of John
October 29, 2013

In this podcast from October 29 in our Newman Nights series, Fr. Michael Castori, S.J., of Santa Clara University, considers how Jesus' rootedness in the history and beliefs of Israel—as stressed in the New Testament and contemporary scholarship alike—can inform and shape Christian life.

Fr. Michael Castori, S.J., Santa Clara University
Incarnation, Jesus, Word
October 27, 2013

How many of Jesus' teachings do we consider an incovenience?

The sinner locked in his sin is closer by God than the observer. Do not trap yourself in smugness and judgment. In reality, "my" achievements, "my" doing comes more from God's grace and gift then your own determination and toil. The Christian life really does begin in vulnerability. God wants to offer us a partnership in love, life and future.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar / Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar / Associate Director of CCAS
Pharisee, tax collector, smugness, complacent, partnership
October 22, 2013

Professor Catherine Murphy of Santa Clara University discusses the portrayal of Jesus in Reza Aslan's recent best-seller as a Zealot, crucified by the Romans for political and economic sedition. 

Prof. Catherine Murphy, Santa Clara University
Newman Night, empires, kingdoms, zealots
October 20, 2013

We tend to lose hope when we face difficulties, but God wants us to remain faithful because He hears our prayers and will answer them. God's faithfulness is the one constant that we can always rely on. Through our struggles, we can find a stronger relationship with God, who sustains us. The Lord has a great plan for our lives, but we must be truly ready to follow Him.

 

Preacher: Patricia Bolle

Patricia Bolle
Difficulties, Hope, Prayers, Faith, Faithfulness, Struggles, Plan, Relationship, Follow
October 15, 2013

God has many faces, and in this session Bishop McElroy explores the six foremost of them: the God of Hope, Grace, Redemption, Forgiveness, Providence and Compassion. Because we are continuously immersed in God's gifts of grace, we can sometimes forget thier importance.  We are called to become more attuned to Him through contemplation and appreciation of His many faces during the day.

Lecturer:  Bishop Robert W. McElroy, Archdiocese of San Francisco 

 

 

Bishop Robert W. McElroy, Archdiocese of San Francisco
Newman Nights, Face of God, hope, grace, redemption, forgiveness, providence, compassion
October 13, 2013

Differences greatly scare people. In turn, people love putting up walls as long as they are inside of them. God desides to become an outsider in Jesus for us. He becomes one with us in our brokenness. Jesus tore down every wall that people put up. Real spiritual signs only begin when we see ourselves and others differently, as God sees us. We are called to tear down the walls of isolation. These walls can be broken when we reach out like Jesus and become His touch.

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Jesus, Walls, Differences, Outsider, Samaritan, Spirituality
October 8, 2013

When we look carefully into the teachings of Genesis chapter 1, there are surprising symmetries and apparent discordances that provide challenges to our understanding of the Biblical creation story. By reading carefully we will be enriched in our knowledge.

Lecturer: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Genesis, creation, Newman Night
October 6, 2013

The parable of the mustard seed tells us to always seek increased faith in the Spirit. Fr. Nathan describes his father's struggles to provide for his family. He put his faith in God (and life insurance!).

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
September 29, 2013

The "knowing-doing problem" occurs when one *doesn't* turn knowledge into action.  Jesus asks today- Can we know about poverty but ignore it?

Preacher: Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Poverty, "knowing-doing problem"
September 22, 213

Jesus tells the parable of the estate manager, who, about to be fired, reduces the debts of the rich man's slaves in order to be well thought of. Jesus praises the manager for his clever actions and reminds us that we can't serve two masters- God and Wealth.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of CCAS

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of CCAS
Serve two masters, wealth
September 15, 2013

The gospel today recounts the father's celebration upon the return of the prodigal son, to the dismay of the older son. Both sons dishonored the father, but the father rejoiced and loved them both. We must always love our sisters and brothers, even when they act foolishly.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar / Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar / Associate Director of CCAS
Prodigal Son
September 8, 2013

The gospel reading for today seems decidedly odd: "You must hate your family, in order to be my disciple". But this must be placed in context of the times, where it was customary for clans to stick together while shunning or even disliking other families. So Jesus' words were meant in the spirit of embracing our neighbors, instead of only our close family.  Do we love a few to the exclusion of all others?

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Hate, Love
September 1, 2013

This Sunday's theme is humility, with Father Xavier giving the example of an irate customer yelling angrily at the airline clerk, "Do you know who I am?", whereupon the clerk asked over the PA, "Can anyone tell this man who he is?"  God humbled himself so that his body and blood fits inside us.  We too must strive to be meek, until we are called to glory in the resurrection.

Preacher: Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Humility
August 25, 2013

As members of Stanford's community, we strive passionately for new knowledge, to push the envelope.  Do we also strive to have the best spiritual life we can?  Many are turned from the narrow gates as evildoers and disbelievers. Let us strive as hard for closeness to Jesus as we do for understanding the physical world.

This is Fr. Isaiah's last sermon at Stanford's CCAS.  We already miss him but thank him for 3 beautiful years with us.  We wish him continued passion in his new life in San Francisco.  Godspeed, Fr. Isaiah!

Preacher: Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar /Associate Director of the Catholic Community

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar /Associate Director of the Catholic Community
passion, narrow gate
August 18, 2013

In the Gospel, Jesus tells of bringing division to mankind, not unity.  Yet, we are united through the Eucharist, the One Body of our Lord. What can He have meant?  While we are united with others through our baptism, our own body and soul may be divided- our mind telling us one thing, while our body does something else.  We are therefore called to heal the divisions within ourselves, always looking to Christ, who endured the shame of crucifixion to save us,  as the supreme example.

Preacher: Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar /Associate Director of the Catholic Community

Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar /Associate Director of the Catholic Community
Division, one body
August 11, 2013

The Holy Father teaches that the opposite of faith is not unbelief—rather, it is idolatry. We wander from one lord to another, from things that keep us away from the one person who created, loved and calls us to be the authentic version of ourselves.. We must ask ourselves if we are equally zealous about our relationship with God as we are about politics, or social justice, or music. We are called individually into a community. As the faith was given to us by others, so is the faith shared with others in the here and now.

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, parochial vicar/associate director, CCAS

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Zealous, Belief, Wandering, Faith, Idolatry, Creed
August 8, 2013

The rich man's foolishness was not that he was successful, but rather that he did not thank God, that he took God for granted. Are the things we own leading us to God? Are they uniting us to God and with the rest of the Body of Christ? We must strive to be saints, to focus on leading a life of virtue. May we be the saints of God.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Lawyer, Nonprofit, Saint, Thankful
July 28, 2013

God desires for our perseverance in prayer. He isn't distant, remote, or up-in-the-sky. Our God is near. And He is our friend. The Holy Spirit is the one thing that we can be sure of that God wants to give us. We don't have to bargain for His Spirit, all we need is to ask for it. God wants to share in intimacy with us. He wants to share with us bread and life and His Holy Spirit.

 

Preacher: Deacon John Kerrigan

Deacon John Kerrigan
Perseverance, Prayer, Holy, Spirit, Intimacy
July 21, 2013

Martha's sister Mary sat at the feet of Jesus and assumed a role that wasn't considered hers in those days.  It was shameful of her in Martha's eyes, but Jesus did not mind.  Rather, Jesus associated with people that society looked down upon.  Jesus entered the home of Martha and Mary, but He was the one providing hospitality.  Jesus was feeding Mary with the Father's love and life.  This "divine" hospitality was of God's new house, the Kindgom.  Our job in our lives today is to live out the belovedness God has for us, to live out God's hospitality for others, and to therefore, be alive.

 

Preacher: Father Xavier Lavagetto, OP, Western Dominican Province

Father Xavier Lavagetto OP
Mary, Divine, Hospitality, Kingdom, Alive
July 14, 2013

The story of the good Samaritan. The law student in it thought that he knew more than Jesus. Jesus could have easily shown His own superiority, but His Jesus' job was to unify, not divide. Instead, Jesus reached into the student's heart to find the goodness that was there. Like He does the law student, Jesus takes us on a journey and walks it with us. The student first lived in his mind, but Jesus showed him how to live in his heart, just as we are called to live in ours.

 

Preacher: Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community.

Preacher: Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community
Good, Samaritan, Heart, Journey
July 7, 2013

Jesus wants us to have the entire universe as a home, feeling as if we belong everywhere.  The Lord sees what we are capable of even when we don't see it, and He invites us along in His journey.  Jesus sends us out to proclaim His Word, giving us His blessing and sometimes even directing us beyond security and safety.  He teaches us how to be a citizen of the universe and is with us wherever we go.

 

Preacher: Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community.

Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community
Universe, Home, Citizen
June 30, 2013

The goal of Jesus' life was to ascend to Heaven, but He could only do that if He took the road to death and resurrection, or the Road to Jerusalem. He calls us to a new humanity and consciousness because God cannot use us for His works unless we undergo a change of mind. We are called to bind together the human and the divine by recognizing God in everyone. We are called to make this "new" humanity a reality.

Preacher: Fr. Richard M. Kingsley, Pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Tucson, AZ.

Preacher: Fr. Richard M. Kingsley, Pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Tucson, AZ
Road, Jerusalem, Humanity, Mind
June 6, 2013

Jesus asks a most important question: "Who do you say I am?". The answer to that question tells more about ourselves than about Jesus. All our awards, accolades and achievements are of little consequence relative to our being a Christian.

Preacher: Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS
Christian, "Who do you say I am", Aquinas
June 9, 2013

Elijah and Jesus both went to upper chambers; Elijah to pray for a boy's life, and Jesus to give all of humanity new life through the body and blood of the Eucharist.  May we receive God's grace and remember his love for us throughout each day.

Preacher: Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director CCAS.

Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director CCAS
Elijah, the upper chamber, Eucharist
June 4, 2013

The last lecture for the Spring quarter, this discussion focuses on the rich use of iconography in the Catholic Church over the centuries- its rise, decline and re-emergence. 

Lecturer: Colleen Power, MA, Director of student services at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology

Colleen Power, MA, Director of student services at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology
iconography, images
June 3, 2013

The final lecture in the course focuses on the reception of Gaudium et spes in the US, unresolved tensions between the spirit of renewal from Vatican II and retrenchment of the Church to a siege mentality, and signs of renewed growth in Joy and Hope.

Speakers: Prof. Bryan Massingale, Marquette University & Prof. Kristen Heyer, Santa Clara University.

Prof. Bryan Massingale, Marquette Unicersity & Prof. Kristen Heyer, Santa Clara University.
Gaudium et spes, social justice in US
June 2, 2013

Father Nathan talks about the "Crypto-Catholic", one who does not wish to advertise his faith, and that Christ so loves us that he becomes small enough to be brought inside our own boidies. Brother Pius noted that when he was in college he was a Crypto-Cathloc who denied the meaning of his name, until one day a friend intrduced him to a priest whose influence ended up changing Brother Pius' life.

Preachers: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS; Brother Pius, Dominican Novice.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS; Brother Pius, Dominican Novice
Corpus Christi, Body and Blood, Crypto Catholic
May 26, 2013

Three persons, but one Lord of all.  Today we gaze into the depths of heaven to try to understand this mystery. With the end of the academic quarter, there are many pressures to finish, but we are guided by our God to find Truth. Truth is hard, because it demands we recall memories of things lost, but also blessings gained.  Truth resides in the soul.

Preacher: Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of CCAS, intro by Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director

Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of CCAS, intro by Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director
Holy trinity, truth, memories
May 21,2013

There are three levels of religious liberty in Catholic theology: individual conscience, which is God-given and sacrosanct, freedom for religious communities to practice, which is slightly restircted, and freedom of individuals to operate in society, for which more bounds are operative. Bishop McElroy discusses these levels and their implications, and asks questions such as the degree to which free will is a blessing or a scourge on society.

Lecturer: Bishop Robert W. McElroy, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of San Francisco.

Bishop Robert W. McElroy, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
Religious liberty, conscience, separation of church/state
May 20, 2013

The eighth lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by Fr. Leon Hooper, SJ from Georgetown University. He is joined in the second half by panelists David Kennedy, Stanford and David deCosse, Santa Clara University, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

Fr. Leon Hooper, SJ, Georgetown University
religious liberty, religious freedom
May 19, 2013

The Holy Spirit infuses us with his gifts, and we are heirs to the kingdom of God. Each of has different skills, talents and blessings.  Let our physics, biology, comparative literature and the countless other aspects of our lives be an offering that speaks of the majesty of God to all we meet.

Preacher:  Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS
Pentecost, Holy Spirit, Gifts
May 13, 2013

The seventh lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by Catharine Cornille, Professor of cmparative theology at Boston College. She is joined in the second half by panelists Scotty McLennan, Dean of Religious Life, Stanford; Assistant Professor Akiba Lerner, Religious Studies, Santa Clara; Maboob Khan, Bay Area Sufi Communityi, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

Prof. Paul Crowley
Vatican II, other religions, milestone, comparative religion
May 14, 2013

Father Michael Fones discusses the gifts given to us by God, our Charisms. We don't earn them and they do not serve us directly, but can only be used for others, and only for good. Some charisms are wisdom, understanding, organization; all are personalized for us by God, and strengthened by our use.

Lecturer: Michael Fones, OP, Student Master, Western Dominican Province

Michael Fones, OP, Student Master, Western Dominican Province
Charisms, God's gifts
May 12, 2013

Jesus rose into glory with the Father, but is with us always. Fr. Nathan asks us which of seven gifts we seek today:Wisdom, Understanding, Knowledge, Counseling, Piety, Courage, or Awe.  The Holy Spirit will give us all of these gifts if we but ask.

Preacher: Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS
Wisdom, Understanding, Knowledge, Counseling, Piety, Courage, Awe
May 6, 2013

The sixth lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by Jerome Baggett, Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara. He is joined in the second half by panelist Albert Gelpi, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

 

 

 

 

Jerome Baggett, Albert Gelpi
Vatican II, Catholicism, Modern World
May 5, 2013

The readings remind us that two thousand yeas ago, the fledging Jesus movement was in danger of dying out. But the Holy Spirit kept it alive, even as the Spirit does today.  That is because Jesus promised to be with us always.

Preacher: Reverend Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
Holy Spirit, Jesus Movement
April 30, 2013

Sr. Marrianne Farina discusses ecumenism, and how dialog with each other is the first step towards uniting the world in Christ.In the Vatican II council, the pope intentionally sat cardinals from different parts of the world together, invited Christians of other faiths and established informal coffee bars to foster such dialog. We are called to be Christ for each other.

Speaker:  Sr. Marianne Farina, CSC is Chair of the department of Theology, Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology.

Sr. Marianne Farina, CSC is Chair of the department of Theology, Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology.
Ecumenism, dialog
April 29, 2013

The fifth lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by Prof. Paul Lakeland of Fairfield University. He is joined in the second half by panelist Catherine Wolff, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

Prof. Paul Lakeland, Catherine Wolff
Laity, Vatican II
April 28, 2013

Father Isaiah discusses the day Jesus was betrayed by Judas, the same day Jesus gave his disciples a new commandment: Love one another as I have loved you. In connection with the CCAS spring break trip to Arizona to witness immigration issues, grad student Erica Fernandez describes her experience growing up poor and the difficulties she and her family faced in immigrating to America.

Speakers Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS & Grad Student Erica Fernandez

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS & Grad Student Erica Fernandoz
Betrayal, Love one another, Immigration
April 22, 2013

The fourth lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by Catherine Murphy and Barbara Green. They are joined in the second half by panelists Steven Weitzman, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

Speaker

Catherine Murphy, associate professor in religious studies at Santa Clara, Barbara Green, teacher as a member of school of the Grauate Theological Union in Berkeley, Steven Weitzman, the Daniel E. Koshland professor of Jewish Culture and Religion and director of the Taube Center for Jewish Studies. 

Catherine Murphy, Barbara Green, Steven Weitzman
Vattican II, RELS 64, REL 82
April 21, 2013

Today's speacker Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain of the Catholic commuity, talks about being a true follower as a sheep of the good shepherd. We have to ask to ourselves that what is the voice of the shepherd directing ourselves to serve one another, because if we do well without doing good, we are not living the gospel!

Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain of the Catholic Community
shepherd, sheep
April 16, 2013

If we assume a fundamental pluralism, can we speak of a "common good"? If not then according to Catholic social teaching, there is nothing to legitimize the authority of government.  Fr. Sweeney proposes that subsidiarity may offer a proper way out of of this conundrum.

Speaker:  Fr. Michael Sweeney, OP, President of Dominican School of Philosophy abd Theology, Berkeley.

 

 

Fr. Michael Sweeney, OP, President of Dominican School of Philosophy abd Theology, Berkeley.
common good, pluralism, subsidiarity
April 15, 2013

The third class and discussion in the class RELS 64/REL 82 at Stanford, this session's lecture is by Prof. Gary Macy, Santa Clara University, with response by panelists Sr. Gloria Marie Jones and Deacon John Kerrigan. The topic is the Council's reinstatement of the deaconate as an ordained ministry in the Catholic Church.  The discussants argue that there is growing interest in the installation of women as deacons.

Prof. Gary Macy, Santa Clara University
Vatican II, RELS 64, REL 82, Orders
April 14, 2013

Love can get one in trouble.  Jesus asks Peter three times: "Do you love me?", and Peter answers, "Lord, you know that I do."  By doing so Peter was rehabilitated from his thrice-denial of Christ. On this day of confirmation for 5 of our community, we need often to be renewed as well.

Preacher,  Monsignor Fran Cilia, Vicar General of the Diocese of San Jose   

Monsignor Fran Cilia, Vicar General of the Diocese of San Jose
Confirmation, Love, renewal
April 7, 2013

Speaker Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano takes us on a tour of the hardware and software of the Mass- the vestments, the books, the chalice, etc. The talk was accompanied by illustrative and beautiful slides of Stanford's Memorial Church.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the CCAS
Liturgical tour, Mass elements
April 8, 2013

The second lecture in the CCAS class, Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity, is by FR. Mark Francis, CSV, Santa Clara University. He is joined in the second half by panelists Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain at CCAS and Ann Grycz from St. Patrick's Seminary, as well as by class director Fr. Paul Crowley.

Fr. Mark Francis, CSV, Santa Clara University, Nancy Greenfield, CCAS, Ann Grycz, St. Patricks Seminary.
Vattican II, RELS 64, REL 82
April 7, 2013

Father Nathan describes meeting a new friend, who changes his heart and causes him to think deeply about how he is loved by God.  Do we know God believes in us, and can we learn to believe more fully in others?

Preacher: Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Beloved, belief, Divine Mercy Sunday
April 2, 2013

In this talk, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano discusses the mission of the Church, which is to disseminate the message of Jesus Christ into the world. At Stanford, that is akin to "setting the tree on fire". This is a follow-on to the Vatican-II symposia.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate director of the CCAS
Mission, Vatican II, Newman Nights
April 1, 2013

The first lecture in the CCAS course RELS 64/REL 82, this session provides a historic context for the period before and during the Council. The speaker is Fr. Stephen Schloesser, SJ, from Loyola University, with introductory remarks by Prof. Paul Crowley, SJ, visiting professor of religious studies at Stanford and the course director.

Stephen Schloesser, SJ
Vatican II Course, RELS 64, REL 82
March 31, 2013

After the Resurrection, Jesus is seen by many of his disciples, including the two on the road from Jerusalem. He vanishes from their sight, but burns on in their hearts. Let this Easter renew Christ within us as well.

Preacher: Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter, the risen Christ
March 30, 2013

Many people reported seeing beautiful butterflies during a catastrophic tornado in Joplin.  Could those butterflies have been the Holy Spirit?  We need to ponder and be open to the many faces of God, and that the resurrected Christ loves and watches over us every moment.

Preacher, Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Easter, Vigil, Resurrection, butterflies
March 29, 2013

The unique feature of Catholocism is our believe in Jesus, who became human to help us rise from sin, and to show us how deeply were are loved by God.  Each of us has God's full attention, as our Creator, as God the Son and as God the Holy Spirit.  (The last minute of the sermon was not recorded due to technical failure.)

Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.
Good Friday, Passion
March 28, 2013

Christianity is a faith filled with reversals.  Jesus, the Son of Man, wore simple clothes and sought the company of the lowly and downtrodden. The death of God brings humanity to life through the cleansing act of humbly washing each other's feet.

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar and Associate Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.
Holy Thursday, Lord's Supper, Washing of feet
March 23, 2013

Today's podcast is the reading of the Passion of our Lord. It is narrated by Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the Catholic Community, Leo Kusber, and student Natasha Abadilla.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of CC@S, Leo Kusber, and student Natasha Abadilla.
Passion of our Lord
March 17, 2013

Have you heard about a Stanford duck syndome or a Facebook page, Stanford Confessions? Today's story of Jesus and a woman caught in adultery provides crucial lessons toward those existing phenomenon. Not only He forgives us, treats us with compassion, but also he teaches us to be a man and woman fully human and alive in Christ Jesus. 

Preacher, Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
woman caught in adultery, compassion
March 10, 2013

The parable of the prodigal son usually is highlighted as demonstrating the mercy of the Father and the introspection of the son in seeking reconciliation with his father for having sinned. Today, Fr. Isaiah instead ponders the older son, who asks, "where's the justice?". We, too, may suffer from bitterness, grudges, discrimination, but we are called to move beyond our past, forgive, and enter into God's banquet

Preacher: Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS.

Father Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of the CCAS.
Prodigal son, forgiveness, reconciliation
March 9, 2013

Welcome to a special edition of Catholic Cardinal Reflections.  On Saturday March 9th, the Catholic Community hosted a symposium entitled "The Legacy and Unfinished Business of Vatican II:Personal Reflections".  Our first speaker is Reverend Mister Bill Detewig, PhD, Deacon of the Diocese of Monterey. Deacon Detewig will present "Historical and Contextual Setting of the Council"  We hope you enjoy.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Vatican History, Context
March 9, 2013

Welcome to a special edition of Catholic Cardinal Reflections.  On Saturday March 9th, the Catholic Community hosted a symposium o the Second Vatican Council.  Our Second speaker is Most Reverend  John Quinn, Emeritis of the Archdiocese of San Francisco.   Introduced by Reverend Paul Crolwly, SJ, of Santa Clara Univeristy.  His Excellency will present "Church Structure and Governance".  We hope you enjoy.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Vatican, Governance, Papacy, Patriarchy
March 9, 2013

Welcome to a special edition of Catholic Cardinal Reflections.  On Saturday March 9th, the Catholic Community hosted a symposium entitled "The Legacy and Unfinished Business of Vatican II: Personal Reflections".  Our Third speaker is Thomas C Fox of the National Catholic Reporter.  He  will present "Role of the Laity Post-Council.  We hope you enjoy.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Vatican, Laity
March 3, 2013

Moses asks a very important question of the burning bush: "Who are you?". God replies, "I am", the entity from which all good things come. The great I Am, the sustainer, nourisher, the source of living water, who desperately wants us to love him.  We are called to be saints.

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
I Am, Burning bush, Sainthood
February 24, 2013

Transfiguration

Have you ever experienced transfiguration in any moment of your life? Today's preachers, Fr. Nathan and a senior student Megan, talk about their life experiences on how God deeply touched their mind and got transfigured in a completely different way.   

Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the CCAS, and Megan O'Neil, a senior student at Stanford University.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community, Megan O'Neil, a senior student at Stanford University
Transfiguration
February 17, 2013

Lent is the season not about "Me" but about "Me,too."

From today's gospel, Jesus faced a lot of temptations for forty days, and so do we in our life; his humanity is fully linked to our life, saying "Me,too!" However, Jesus remained faith in his mission and his humanity shows us a model of transcending temptations, loving our neighbors, and practicing justice. These are what we are called to do during this Lent: "Me, too!" to our Lord, Jesus Christ and to our neighbor. 

Preacher, Rev. Mr John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS

Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS
Lent, temptation, justice, empathy
February 10, 2013

In today's readings and gospel, three people, Isaiah, Paul, and Simon, show the example of how each of them allows God to penetrate the deeper level of oneself and how they are led by God next. We are about to be invited into the season that prepares us for Easter. What we need to do for this preparation is to practice: letting God penetrate ourselves over our weakness which blocks us from Him and responding to Him by giving our talents back, so that we are fully alive and avaible to God.   

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community
Prepare, Lent
February 3, 2013

Only by hanging out with someone can we begin to to begin to love them. It's through the loving relationship with God and His followers that we can come and love the truth that God has set before us. Loving God is one step, but allowing God to make you a better person is the next step. Therefore, let us be pliable enough to be corrected.

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
destined, relationship, truth
January 27, 2013

We're always future oriented, looking at tomorrow, at that goal. But, what if the future arrived yesterday? Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing. Jesus came down from heaven to show us how to live life in its fullness, embedded with the deep sense of peace and joy. He showed us a life in which every day we embrace as a gift from the Father. 

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
future, scripture, promise, fulfilled, Walk for Life
January 20, 2013

Do you know what you have recieved?  Do you know why you follow Jesus?  Come and recieve the light and joy of Jesus Christ--and the breadth and richness of our faith.

 

Preacher, Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community

Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
marriage, union
January 13, 2013

John's followers had great expectations of him, expecting him to be the Christ. But John said he, too, was waiting for something greater to come. Baptism was Jesus' way to imprint himself into our very existence, into the people of God. We should expect that He hears and He answers our prayers, but God knows how to bring us into the fullness of life so much better than we, in his own way and his own time.

Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
expectations, wait, baptism
January 6, 2013

The Magi were scholars of mathematics, and like most of the Stanford community, were seekers of knowledge. Characteristic of such learned persons is that they know much, but also know that there is much more that they don't know.  We should use our finite mind to always seek to know our infinite God and his plan for us.  Preacher, Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS.

Father Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS.
Epiphany, Magi, Wise men.
December 25, 2012

Christmas is often a time for many celebrations with family and friends. But the biggest and most important part of the Christmas celebration happens inside us.  It is God's Son wanting to dwell within us and love us.  Take a quiet moment to reflect on the enormity of God's love inside us, and how that directs us to live.  Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community.
Jesus, Christmas
December 25, 2012

Are we as zealous for the Word of God as some in our culture are for Harry Potter?  Can we fall in love with the Holy Child?  Fr Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, preacher

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Harry, Potter, Christmas, child, impatient
December 23, 2012

When Mary visited Elizabeth and the baby lept in Elizabeth's womb, we are reminded of Mary's complete submission to the Lord: I am your servant, God.  That is wise council for us:  "Dear God, what can I do for you, today? How can I best demonstrate your grace to others?"  Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of the Catholic Community
Mary, servant, grace
December 16, 2012

What shall we do?  In this chaotic world, be willing to enter into the chaos of another to find joy and hope.  Let mercy be the home of your joy by following Jesus.  Preacher, Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of CCAS.

 

Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of CCAS.
Chaos, mercy
December 8, 2012

This Mass is the CCAS' traditional holiday celebration with choir, strings, brass, drums and organ to announce the coming of our Lord.  Father Nathan reminds us that the early part of the Gospel of Luke is highly musical, with the song of Zachariah, the canticle of Mary and that of Simeon, who met the baby Jesus in the temple.  Make way for Jesus in your heart; he IS the way.  Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS
Music, "I am the Way"
December 2, 2012

The Advent season is all about hope, a virtue that allows us to persevere, to look towards God and the coming of his Son.  We trust in God as the giver of all good things.  Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS, Preacher.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Hope, perseverence
November 25, 2012

Christ is the King of a kingdom made of love, where virtue reigns over gold, where competition means drawing out the excellence in our neighbors, where love of God and of our brothers is King.  It is our task to integrate these teachings of Jesus into every minute of every day, no matter where we are- desk, mall, home.  Preacher, Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Kingdom of God, love,
November 18, 2012

Mark's words about the end of the world were not intended to be frightening; rather to comfort the people of his day. We are meant to witness to God every day, not to wait for the end.  The question is, what have we done today to save the world?  Preacher, Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain of the CCAS.

Due to equipment failure, the end of the sermon was lost.

Nancy Greenfield, Chaplain of the CCAS.
Apocalypse, end of world, God's witness
November 11, 2012

The woman gave Elija food from her meager supply, and was rewarded with much more than she gave.  The woman in the temple gave all her money to the treasury.  So we are reminded that when we give ourself and our treasure to others, we are rewarded manyfold.  This is another way of loving God. Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of CCAS.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS
Giving, woman in temple
November 4, 2012

The greatest commandment is to love God and others. Why is it so hard to follow?  We learn to love by practice, and when we do we ar not far from the kingdom of God. Preacher, Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS.

Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS
Love, kingdom of God
October 28, 2012

The rich man was sad because he had many possessions and was unable to follow Jesus without disposing of them. Sometimes our material possessions choke our faith. We are called to good stewardship and give to our church and others through our heart.  Preacher Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of CCAS; Stewardship report by Dave Mount, Chair of Finance Council, CCAS.

Sermon by Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor & Director of CCAS; Stewardship report by Dave Mount, Chair of Finance Council, CCAS.
Stewardship
October 21, 2012

Do you know you are loved by God, that he is in you, and he wants you to flourish, like the seed that fell on good soil?  There is the sense of urgency, as the liturgy winds toward events to happen where Jesus gives his life for us.  Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor and Director of the CCAS
God's love, rocky soil, good soil
October 14, 2012

Jesus said, "If you wish to be holy, you must follow me.  But first you must sell all your possessions and give to the poor, for then you will have treasure in heaven."  Let us focus on the important parts of life, and follow Christ.  Preacher, Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the CCAS
Follow Christ
October 7, 2012

In earlier times, people meditated 15 mysteries of Rosary upon the life of Jesus in their own work place applying them into their own life. As today, may we live the mysteries throughout our lives ever proclaiming the greatness of our God. Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS, Preacher

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, Mary, Rosary
September 30, 2012

We must strike a balance between faithfulness to Catholic tradition and being attentive to the spirit of God working in each of us. This occurs through constant prayer and education.  Fortunately the CCAS has many educational opportunities, including the Tuesday night Newman Series.  Preacher, Reverend Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS.

Reverend Mr. John Kerrigan, Deacon of the CCAS
Authority, prophets
September 23, 2012

The disciples wondered which of them was greatest. Competition amongst each other is good, yet Jesus asks us to be servants to all, especially the least one of us.  Preacher:  Fr. Natan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford.

Fr. Natan Castle, OP, Pastor/Director of the Catholic Community at Stanford
Competition, rivalry, service
September 16, 2012

In today's gospel, Jesus asks to his disciples, "Who do you say that I am?" and Peter replies, "You are the Christ." As Jesus anticipated his destiny putting to death for the sake of us, we, as his disciples, can be a Jesus Christ to each other not only by our faith but also by our deeds, sharing the cross that each of us faces in our life journey. Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Community, Preacher

Teresa Pleins, Chaplain of the Catholic Community
Teresa Pleins, cross
September 9, 2012

"Ephphatha!" - that is, "Be opened!"-- Jesus entered the small moments of silence in order to heal us, so that we can proclaim the love of God more faithfully and compellingly. This gives us questions whether we are brave enough to go into the quiet moment for the Christian action, whether we are open to listen to the God, and whether we are dare to enter the new life after we are healed. Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS, Preacher   

 

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, Ephphatha, open
September 2, 2012

Jesus said "This people honors me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me." In order to be truly religious, we need to open our hearts to our neighbors and to our God rather than being obsessed on following of the letter of the law.

Fr. Natahn Castle, OP, Pastor & Director, Preacher

 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Pastor /Director of the Catholic Community
Fr. Nathan, true religion
August 26, 2012

Jesus said repeatedly "You must eat my flesh and drink my blood to have eternal life." To accept this gauntlet requires us to do hard things, things we cannot always understand.  If you pray and seek guidance, you will become enlightened.  Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director, Preacher

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar & Associate Director
Gauntlet, hard things, prayer
August 19, 2012

There is a hunger that lies within each of us that we feel may be restlessness, uneasiness. Allow ourselves to feel that restlessness. Allow ourselves to feel that restlessness.

Let us allow Him to awaken in us all the longings and yearnings in you and me, For in the midst of them, we will discover our heart’s desire.

Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community, Preacher.

Reverend Mister John Kerrigan, Deacon of the Catholic Community
hunger, restless, wisdom
August 12, 2012

Some do not believe they can have a personal relationship with God, nor that the Eucharist is the true Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.  However, by receiving Jesus into our body we unite with God in a personal way that gives us grace, comfort and forgiveness.  Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS, Preacher

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP, Parochial Vicar/Associate Director of CCAS
August 5, 2012

God says "I am with you always".  God is love.  Look for Him in the gentleness of the breeze, in your neighbor's face and in your own reflection in the mirror.  Fr. LaSalle Hallissey, OP, Preacher.

Fr. LaSalle Hallissey, OP
Love, Always, Neighbor
July 29, 2012

Miracles result from generosity.  We can transform the world by practicing generosity every day.  Fr. Brendan McGuire, Preacher.

Fr. Brendan McGuire
Miracles, generosity, loaves and fishes
July 22, 2012

Christ reunites disparate people through dialogue and charity.  Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of CCAS, Preacher.

Reverend John Kerrigan, Deacon of CCAS
Uniqueness, Reunion
July 1, 2012

We must be open to the gravity of the Spirit.  Fr. Brendan McGuire, Preacher.

Fr. Brendan McGuire
Gravity, Spirit
June 24, 2012

St. John the Baptist knew who and what he was.  He knew his singular purpose in life.  May we find ours!

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP, Preacher.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
John, Zechariah, purpose
June 16, 2012

"Live for the future," Leland, Jr., told his father.  We thank you for allowing us in your children's lives for these few years.  But students, do come back and tell us how you have changed the world. Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Preacher.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
future, graduation, Jane, Leland, Stanford
June 10, 2012

The Body of Christ, the People of God.  Fr. Nathan Castle, OP, Preacher.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Water, Fish, Body, Christ
June 3, 2012

Though the mystery of the Most Holy Trinity is ultimately unsolveable, this does not mean that we should place it aside.  Rather, the Mystery of the 3-in-1 propsels us how to live in the Trinity in the here and now.  Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan, Preacher.

Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan
BFF, Trinity, here, now, simple, complex
May 27, 2012

The Pentecost is an event that takes place today and everyday. How is the Holy Spirit alive in your heart right now?

Chaplain Teresa Pleins, Preacher.  

Chaplain Teresa Pleins
Holy Spirit, Pentecost
May 20, 2012 Dcn John Kerrigan, preacher

The Solemnity of the Ascension teaches us that the mandate to spread the Good News is now ours to manifest. 

Rev. Mr. John Kerrigan
baby, Lauren, Ball, good, news
April 6. 2012

The Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose are a fruitful branch in St Dominic's family.

Nancy Greenfield
Dominicans, sisters, Ramona, Gloria, Pat Ann
April 29, 2012

His Excellency, Thomas Daly, Auxiliary Bishop of San Jose, preaches the Mass of Confirmation in Memorial Church.

Most Rev. Thomas Daly
Confirmation, peace, gifts
April 22, 2012

Temporary or permanent?  The ressurection changes us...but how?

Fr. Nathan Castle OP
ser, estar, becoming, Emmaus
April 15, 2012

The Resurrected Lord's first words to us are, "Peace be with you".  What is peace?  How is the Doubting Thomas in instrument of peace? 

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Peace, Thomas, stayed, ponder, pray, discuss
April 8, 2012

Why are we here?  Why do we come to Mass on Easter Sunday?

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Why, We, Here, Moral, System, Religion
April 7, 2012

Father Nathan offers a meditation on Jesus' Ressurection according to the Gospel of Mark.  Happy Easter! 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Resurrection, Jesus, Women, Fear
April 7, 2012

Father Nathan offers a meditation on Jesus' Ressurection according to the Gospel of Mark.  Happy Easter! 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Resurrection, Jesus, Women, Fear
April 5, 2012

Of many things we commemorate on this Mass of the Lord's Supper, one is the generosity of our God.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
God, generosity, washing, feet, eucharist
April 1, 2012

A dramatic reading of the Passion of the Lord Jesus according to the Gospel of Mark.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Passion, Jesus, Crucify
March 18, 2012

The man born blind was recreated as Adam was created in the Genesis account.  The man saw this and believed.  In fact, he sees better than those who were born able to see.  What are we blind to?  Are we so entrenched in what we think as true that we cannot see the unknowable God in a different way? 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Blind, Mud, Jesus, John
March 11, 2012

Is God in our midst or not? ask the Israelites.  The Woman at the well asked that same question too...but got a different result. 

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
woman, well, Israelites, midst, God, dare
March 4, 2012

Today's are dramatic yet terrible readings.  Religion, in fact, would be much safer if we can form God as we would like.  But we need God, not a kitchen waiter.

Chaplain Teresa Pleins
Kitchen, Waiter, Savior, dramatic, son, killing
February 25, 2012

You are beloved.  Lent is a blessed time in which are are invited to fall in love with God once again.  Are you willing to fall in love with God and His Church?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
loved, mom, Lent, community, Stanford
February 22, 2012

Let us not rush on towards Easter, but rather, let us contemplate the lessons of Lent.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Rush, Easter, Contemplate, Lent
February 19, 2012

We have been reading a lot of healing stories?  Are these myths and fairytales...or did they really happen?

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Healing, Stories, Myths, Morality
February 12, 2012

This weekend, we are having the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick offered at our Masses; Fr Nathan challenges us to allow Jesus to heal all of our infirmities.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Anointing, spirit, mind, body
February 5, 2012

Job, a suffering man, is an example of a man who had God and money. Brother Emmanuel looks back at his undergraduate life, and the many care-isms he found. Each person, by the power of baptism, has care-isms. We really want to bring Christ to those in need - his loving and his presence. The application of our care-isms and Christ's healing will make our jobs so much more powerful and enjoyable.

Preach Jesus, not about Jesus.

Brother Emmanuel Taylor, OP
charism, superbowl, job,
January 29, 2012

A prophet has arisen in our midst!  A prophet is not a person that predicts the future, but rather, a person that enfleshes the word of God in today's time & place.  How are we prophets of our God?

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
prophet, called, gifted, enflesh
January 22, 2012

Though many say that the Book of the Prophet Jonah may be a satirical work, the life he lives teaches us that we ought to do away with our spiritual arrogance. 

Chaplain Nancy Greenfield
Jonah, Whale, arrogance
January 15, 2012

Today is the oldest I've ever been.  Or the youngest.  God is always teaching us, reminding us that we are his children.  What will he teach you today?  Listen in and perhaps you'll find out!

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Oldest, Youngest, Called, Gifted, men, retreat
January 8, 2012

Christmas celebrates God becoming man.  Epiphany celebrates Man's response to God. 

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Epiphany, Christmas, new, born, king
December 25, 2011

God is eternally young, always wanting to open presents and be generous.  Are you as generous in your heart?  What would you like for Christmas?  What would you like to be?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Christmas, Eckhart, Meister
December 25, 2011

What is so special about today?  Today is the day that we are reminded of our dignity as a child of the living God!

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Leo, Acknowledge, Dignity, Nativity
18th December 2011

God wants our involvement in His creative projects for our lives, no matter our age or past achievements. Are we too set on our own ideas or can we give God the freedom of our consent as Mary did, to begin anew or a new thing, no matter our stage in life?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Mary, King David, castle, project, God's will
December 10, 2011

John the Baptist spent his life pointing to the coming of the Messiah.  The Lord has anointed us to point the way to the Messiah as well!

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
John, Anointed, Isaiah
December 4, 2011

There are many contradictions in Catholicism.  One is how to prepare ourselves for someone that is already here.  

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Contradiction, human, experience
November 27, 2011

Our first reading from the Prophet Isaiah reminds us that we too are oftentimes of two minds when dealing with God.  Yet the gifts of the Holy Spirit uide up to a deeper relationship with God. 

Fr Nathan Castle, OP
Gifts, Spirit, Isaiah
November 20, 2011

Jesus Christ, the King of the Universe, reigned by service and love.  We are called to serve and love, not only on days of abundace, but on days of destitution as well.

Fr Isaiah Mary Molano, OP
Christ, King, Father, Tom
November 13, 2011

We have been given many things through the Gospel.  As God has been faithful to us, so ought we.  It is time to take a risk and develop our relationship with God. 

Chaplain Teresa Pleins
Gospel, Risk, Responsibility
November 6, 2011

The phrase "The End" has two meanings: (1) the actual end of a thing and (2) the purpose of a thing.  Live the end of your life with a purpose, so when you complete you life, you can look back on your life with God's purpose in mind. 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
end, purpose
October 30, 2011

We are privileged in this world, whether we live in Stanford or simply in the United States.  Fr Isaiah Mary asks whether we are using our privilege towards the good.

Fr Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Privilege, Stanford, priests
October 23, 2011

Catherine Wolff, who has recently returned from her trip to Eastern Africa with Catholic Relief Services, shares her experiences with the Catholic Community at Stanford. 

Catherine Wolff
Africa, Kenya
October 16, 2011

Fr. Michael Fones speaks of the work of faith - the work of relationships - by spending time in conversation with God and through scripture. We need to act upon the guidance from the Holy Spirit is the "work of faith". His story about Michael Cordua reveals the labor of love: love for his employees, his "extended family", in ensuring they also are cared for. In return, the workers paid him through their work in his restaurants.

Fr. Michael Fones
faith, taxes, love, fish, relationships, Fones
Father Nathan asks: What is it that's really important that you're too busy to do? Are you just showing up? The best feasts are those that everybody helped create, contributing a part of something.
Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
wedding, generosity, temple, feast
Oct 2, 2011

Stanford University has produced men and women who have changed the world, excellent in their fields.  According to our preacher, the 3rd Edition of the Roman Missal is an excellent way to pray to God.  May we pray for excellently to God in all that we do. 

Fr Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Excellence, Roman Missal
Sept 25, 2011

Seeing the context of today's Gospel, Father Nathan reminds us of Jesus' promise to be with us till the end.

Fr Nathan Castle, OP
Emmanuel, Temple, I am
September 18, 2011

The generosity of God is mysterious.  But is ours?

Fr Isaiah Mary Molano OP
generosity, offetory
11 September 2011

In the light of the 9/11 tragedy, Fr. Nathan reflects on the cost of the call to forgiveness and Jesus's own words and example. We are invited to prayerful and consciously reflect on interpretations of violence from sacred scripture.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
anger, wrath, forgiveness, violence in scripture
August 28, 2011

Jesus tells Peter, "Get behind me, Satan!"  As in, get in line.  Who is leading who in our life with God?

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Peter, Jesus, Augustine, Michigan
August 21, 2011

Who do you say that I am?  What do you do because I am who you say that I am?

Chaplain Nancy Greenfield
Peter, Jesus
August 14, 2011

Our Father's greatest desire is to bring the human family into the family of God.  How are we frustrating this beautiful dream?

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
desire, real, catholic
August 7, 2011

Saint Dominic, the Patron of Order of Preachers and the Catholic Community at Stanford, was a man of steadfastness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ.  

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Dominic, Peter, Faith
07/31/11

Beginning with need is beginning with what you lack. Yet, when we see what we have and what others have is when we take the first step to being aware of our spiritual resourses. As in the Eucharist, where He takes, He blesses, He breaks, and He gives, we also should in our daily lives become aware, give thanks, and share. In the kingdom of God, no one receives and hold. Everyone receives, and gives.

Fr. Richard Kingsley, priest of diocese of Tucson
24th July 2011

All of us desire spiritual experiences. However spiritual experiences have after effects and change us. Spiritual experiences cost us much. Do we dare sell our possession to buy this pearl of great price?

Fr. Richard Kingsley
spiritual experiences, pearl of great value, treasure, cost
17th July 2011

Fr. Nathan shares some seeds for meditation on the parable where an enemy has mixed weeds with recently planted wheat seeds. Do we understand why God, the landowner, chooses to allow both wheat and weeds to grow together? Are we like the servants, eager to avoid blame and keen on pushing our reasonable and logical solutions, disregarding the will and wisdom of the landowner?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
parable, wheat, weeds, sower, servant, spirit
July 11, 2011

Jesus told the parable of the sower. "Anyone who hears the word and heeds it will bear fruit in abundance." Do you really listen, or think you are? Ask the sower, the lover, to speak in you, because you do have ears.

Fr. Nathan Castle
sower, matthew, hear
3rd July 2011

Fr. Nathan discusses how we tend to approach God with a natural fear and awe at God's greatness and power, looking for God in the distant heavens. We are reminded that although such reverence is proper to God's Infinite Glory, it is also God's preference that we seek God in simplicity and in the easy and lowly things.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
God's greatness, awe, yoke, burden, lowly, colt
June 26, 2011

We may describe the Eucharist as many things.  Today, let us focus on the fact that the Eucharist is Apostolic.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Eucharist, Apostolic, Tabernacles, House, Bread
June 11, 2011

Pentecost Sunday, Class of 2011 Graduation Homily, "Peace be with you."

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
2011, pentecost, graduation
June 5, 2011

Fr. Nathan reflects on the apostles' response to the Ascension. Like the apostles, are we too self-centered in our contemplation of the divine but forgetting our call and mission to preach the good news? Do we allow the Holy Spirit freedom to lead us, even if it throws us off-balance?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
up and down and round-and-round, off-balance, Holy Spirit, call and mission, Ascension
May 29, 2011

Throughout the difficulties of life, God is still in control

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano OP
Hope, God reigns, Difficulties
May 22, 2011

We already have been set apart, chosen by God, already the next big thing. Our destiny is to be the personification of joy and peace in this world.

 

Brother Kevin Andrew talks about his call into the Dominican life.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P., Brother Kevin Andrew
destiny, Brother Kevin, Dominican
May 15, 2011

Jesus is the Gate.  We too are destined, by our baptism, to be open as gates, to allow God's graces into our hearts. 

Fr Nathan Castle, OP
Gate, Alter, Christi, beloved
May 08, 2011

The story of Emmaus asks to ponder who we are journeying with.  Are we willing to allow people into our journey, into our struggles of faith, into our lives?

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Emmaus, journey, seventy-one percent
May 1, 2011

The Most Reverend Patrick J. McGrath, Bishop of the Diocese of San Jose, addresses the confirmandi class of 2011 at their Confirmation Mass.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Bishop McGrath, Confirmation, Love
April 23, 2011

Father Nathan's homily during the Easter Vigil.  Please be forewarned that we had experienced a minor technical difficulty when recording this particular part of the vigil, so we ask you to be patient.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Easter Vigil
April 22, 2011

Father Isaiah's Good Friday Homily at the Celebration of the Lord's Passion.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Jesus, Carpenter
April 21, 2011

Father Nathan's homily for the Mass of the Lord's Supper, Holy Thursday, 2011.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Two things, wash, feet, incomplete
April 17, 2011

A presentation of the Gospel according to Saint Matthew.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Palm, Passion, Sunday, Matthew
April 10, 2011

The Lazarus story is the turning point in John's Gospel.  It's where Jesus calls out his beloved friend to live full life of the Gospel.  Are we willing to live this same life?  Are we willing to live the Gospel?

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Lazarus, stench, aroma
April 3, 2011

The Man Born Blind underwent a transformation when he was healed.  How about us?  How will be be transformed when we are healed by the grace of God?

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Man Born Blind, Graces
March 13, 2011

Giving into sin clouds our judgment and our view of the world, the Church and God. May we pierce the clouds of darkness in this holy season

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Pig-Pen, Clouds, Sinfulness
March 9, 2011

As we begin Lent, let us rest, be still, and allow God into the darkest, deepest recesses of our hearts.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Sermon, Mount, Hearts
March 9, 2011

The Sacraments are transformative.  The Sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation, at every participation, brings us closer to Christ.  As we begin Lent anew, let us take advantage of such wonderful gifts!

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Phoenix, Eucharist, Penance, Lent
February 6, 2011

Lent is soon upon us. In order to prepare, Father Nathan offers some suggestions to allow ourselves to know God more profoundly.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Lent, God, me
February 27, 2011

We have high expectations of ourselves.  However, oftentimes, these expectations make us feel or believe that we are Atlas.  But we aren't Atlas, we're children of a Heavenly Father, one that will provide for us whenever we call upon him.

 

In addition to Fr. Isaiah's homily, we will hear from Mr. Tom Zanzig from Zanzig and Associates.  He will speak to us about our Center for Spiritual and Religious Formation, as well as a possible Lenten practice that will aid and deepen our Christian Spirituality.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Jimmy, Atlas, Tom, Zanzig, minute
February 20, 2011

Love your enemies!  Have you ever wanted to give up on someone?  Ever have a person in your life that just didn't like for some reason?  Father Nathan testifies that you truly can love an enemy, and you and your enemy together, come to Christ.

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
Enemy, Bob, White Jeep, School of Americas
February 13, 2011

Freedom is not merely choosing between X or Y, but rather, chosing what is more excellent for me.  May we chose Jesus Christ, who is Excellence Personified.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Braveheart, Freedom, Law
February 6, 2011

Ever been whitewater rafting?  When a person agrees to follow Jesus Christ, it is very much like rafting on the river.  We are all poor in spirit.  Yet, when we work with the Lord, it will be a wild ride...sort of like whitewater rafting. 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
whitewater rafting, light, salt
January 30, 2011

Saint Thomas Aquinas defines humility as a person seeing God as God sees him or her.  Let us put aside our false notion of humility, and be "poor in spirit".

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
humility, Aquinas, Dolan
January 16, 2011

Father Nathan offers a reflection on the weekend's readings, especially in light of the tragedy in Tucson, Arizona.

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
Isaiah, Gospel, Tucson
January 9, 2011

When John the Baptist baptized his cousin, his entire life transformed.  What about us?  How have our lives ben transformed by encountering Jesus Christ?

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Encounter, transform, El Salvador
December 25, 2010

And the Word became Flesh and dwelt among us. It’s easy for us to marginalize our spiritual lives at times. But Jesus Christ, born today, held the full human experience. Essentially everything we experience Jesus had experienced, only more profoundly. May we Christify our lives and allow Christ to be born in all that we do.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Christmas, Word, Flesh
December 25, 2010

God is the Giver of All Good Gifts.  He lavishes us with his gifts, especially the 7 gifts of the Holy Spirit.  What are you hungry to receive this Christmas? 

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
Christmas, Seven Gifts, Holy Spirit
December 19, 2010

We are always trying to do the right thing. But doing what we think is right is not always necessarily the will the God the Father.

Fr. Isaiah Mary Molano, O.P.
Ahaz, Joseph, Paul, Advent
December 12, 2010

"Are you the one we're waiting for, or ought we wait for another?"

Jesus encourages the followers of John the Baptist to tell John what they see--including the dead being raised.  Fr. Nathan shares a story about a dear friend who died in September, and, in particular, some crystal wine glasses they shared. 

The Advent wreath reminds us that we can offerthe light of Christ's birth to those who are in the dark or are broken.

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
John, wine glasses
December 4, 2010

The phrase “fear of the Lord” is mysterious. However, if we fear the Lord insofar that we fear disappointing our heavenly Father, we find that acting like a child of God in a completely different light. 

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Fear, Lord
November 28, 2010

The Prophet Isaiah tries to put God's dream into words.  For generations, humanity has beeen trying to reach up towards God, setting up altars and holy places on high mountains.  Yet we celebrate that God has come down to us.  The Sacrament of Reconciliation is a good example of this, when God comes down to us to have an intimate relationship with us.  And we know what impact that can cause.  Now imagine the impact we may have on others--people we may not even know--by rejoicing in our relationship wtih God.

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
Isaiah, Mountain, Reconciliation
November 25, 2010

Welcome to a special edition of Catholic Cardinal Reflections!

What does Thanksgiving do?  Thanksgiving seems to remind us about the goodness of all that God has given us.  Yes, our world sometimes seems to be a dark and dreay place, but we still have our faith, the goodness of friends, family and good food.  Let us celebrate!

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Thanksgiving
November 21, 2010

On this Christ the King Sunday, we are challenged to learn what kind of power Jesus Christ possesses.  Jesus Christ shows us with his power a new way of being, not one of domination. 

Nancy Greenfield
Jesus, Pilate, procession, Christ the King
November 77, 2010

The seven brothers and their mother are an excellent example of what it means to live and die for your faith. St John Chrysostom is a wonderful example of this, consistently advocating for the poor of Constantinople in the face of the Empress of Byzantium. May we always choose the right, seeking the glory and honor of our Father in heaven.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Courage, John Chrysostom, Aristotle
October 30, 2010

It is quite easy to let a person disappear by labling him or her "tax collector" or "illegal immigrant" or "terrorist".  Yet each one of us is a child of God.  It is difficult to write each other off when we know each other's name and heart.

Teresa Pleins
Zaccheus, mercy
October 17, 2010

In his letter to Timothy, Saint Paul is eager to tell him to proclaim the word.  Interestingly, Paul does not tell him how to proclaim the word, but rather, to proclaim it.  Each one of us are called to proclaim the word of God in our own way, using all the gifts, charisms and talents that God has given us.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Mission Impossible, baptism, proclaim, word
October 10. 2010

Namaan, the great General from the Syrian Army, and the Samaritan Leper had the graciousness to say thank you to God for their healing.  Though outsiders, they did what no other 'insider' would do.  According to Saint Thomas Aquinas, the Eucharist is the medicine for the soul.  Are we thankful enough for this wonderful gift?

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Namaan, Leper, thankful
October 3, 2010

The Gospel passage regarding the mustard seed asks to become apostles, not merely disciples.  Being an apostle is allowing the love that Jesus has for you to set ablaze every part of your life, to the point that you are being Christ to the world because, simply, that is what a servant is meant to do.

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
college, mustard seed, useless servant
September 26, 2010

Relationships take time to develop.  Lazarus and the rich man had a relationship, but one constituted of apathy.  How many people do we know by name, but instead of treating them as a human being, ignore them as the rich man did Lazarus?

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Lazarus, rich man, relationship
September 19. 2010

The Prophet Amos and Jesus challenge us to prioritize our lives.  What is important to you?  Our material things or our relationships?  How can we allow God give us a network of love of which God is in the center?

Fr. Nathan Castle, O.P.
Amos, Temporary, relationship
September 12, 2010

Families are messy things.  Yet mysteriously and profoundly, families are are road to love God and one another.  May we be a true brother, sister, father or mother to all, and bring them to Christ.

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Family, Prodigal Son
August 29, 2010

Jesus asks us, "What does it mean to be a friend?"  Are friends people that you can get something out of?  Or are they people your genuinely love?  Jesus gets nothing from our friendship but our love, yet calls his friends anyway.  May we be faithful to this friendship, so when we see him face-to-face, he will say to us, 'Friend, come up higher".

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
friend
August 15, 2010

Mary of Nazareth, when her time on earth had ended, was assumed, body and soul, into heaven.  This reward was not given to her merely because she was the Mother of God, the Mother of Jesus.  Rather, it was because of her continual fidelity to, and love for, God.  May we continually be devoted to Jesus Christ as she!

Fr. Isaiah M. Molano, O.P.
Assumption, Mary, Jesus, fiat
August 8, 2010

Faith is trusting God in his promises. It is loving God and trusting that He will act, as he had promised us long ago. St Dominic started a preaching order to help others love God and his promises. Let us keep the faith!

Since St Dominic is the patron of Community, we celebrated St. Dominic, though the readings were from the day, namely, the 18th Sunday of Ordinary Time, Cycle C

Fr. James Thompson, O.P.
faith, dominic
October 18, 2009

We oftentimes have our own plans and vision of the road ahead. But Jesus’ plans are oftentimes different than ours. He calls us to drink a cup full of joys, sufferings and gifts that we cannot ever imagine. It’s easy to want Jesus to take this the cup away. Yet, Jesus gave us an example, a life, to do the God the Father’s will. By partaking in the Eucharist, we remember how much Jesus cares for us – so much so that He has given us his very self.

Fr. Carl Schlichte, OP
October 11, 2009

The rich young man teaches us the value of stewardship, and giving our gifts for the good of God’s Church and the world. Though priests and religious take a vow of poverty, even our preacher gives a tithe of goods for the good of the community. We are challenged not only to receive the goods we have received, but rather to give of our own goods for the sake of our community. 

Fr. Nathan Castle, OP
October 4, 2009

Without the Spirit of God, we are like the dry bones of Ezekiel’s vision. By the Spirit of God, we are fully alive, the People of God. God’s Spirit always triumphs over all our trials, no matter how daunting. With our busy lives, how do we allow the Breathe of Life, the Holy Spirit, to enliven and empower us?

Fr. Carl Schlichte, OP
ezekiel, holy spirit
September 27, 2009
Fr. Nathan Castle, OP